Order of Battle - American Forces - World War I

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Order of Battle - American Forces - World War I

First Division (Regular Army)

The division insignia is a crimson figure "1", on khaki background. Chosen because the numeral "1" represents the number of the division and many of its subsidiary organizations. Also, as proudly claimed, because it was the first division in France; first in sector; first to fire a shot at the Germans; first to attack; first to conduct a raid; first to be raided; first to capture prisoners; first to inflict casualties; first to suffer casualties; first to be cited singly in general orders; first in the number of the division, corps and army commanders and general staff officers produced from its personnel; last to leave war zone.

The first units left the United States June 14, 1917, and the last units arrived in France July 2, 1917. The division went into the Grondrecourt training area for training. It entered the line in the Sommerville sector, ten kilometers southeast of Nancy, for instructional purposes under French command October 21st, and withdrew the night of November 20, 1917. This sector was quiet. Entered the Ansauville section under tactical command of the French. This sector was approximately twenty kilometers northwest of Toul. Sector quiet with occasional active days. Division withdrew April 3d. The 1st Artillery Brigade was the only American artillery in action during this period. Entered the Cantigny section, five kilometers west of Montdidier, April 25th. The Cantigny operation was carried out the morning of May 28th, the division advancing the line three to six hundred yards on a twenty-two-hundred yard front. Division was relieved July 7, 1918. Entered the line the night of July 17, 1918, for the Soissons operation, approximately fifteen kilometers southwest of Soissons. The fighting was severe throughout the attack, especially July 20th and 21st. The division was relieved after having reached Berzy le Sec. Entered the Saizerais section on August 7th. The sector was quiet and the division was relieved August 24th.

St. Mihiel operation: Elements of the division commenced entering the sector of September 6th, completing the relief September 11th. Began an attack on September 12th in the Beaumont sector, twenty kilometers northwest of Toul. On September 13th the division was regrouped and held in reserve of the 4th Army Corps. The division had advanced its line fourteen kilometers in nineteen hours. In the operation east of the Argonne and west of the Meuse, the division moved into line October 1st and attacked in the Cheppy sector, one kilometer west of Varennes, continuing the attack until the night of October 11th, when it was relieved. The division had advanced approximately seven kilometers. On November 6th, elements of the division attacked in the area of Mouzon. At 2 p.m. orders were received to assemble the division and march to Sedan. The division attacked the heights south and southwest of Sedan on the morning of November 7th. At 2 p.m. the division was ordered to withdraw. Commenced its march to the Coblenz bridgehead from Abaucourt on November 17th. Marched through Lorraine and the Grand Duchy of Luxembourg. Crossed the Rhine on December 13th. Occupied its area east of Rhine in the Coblenz bridgehead, December 14th.

General Pershing, almost without exception, picked out the 1st Division for the vital position, or post of honor, in most of his big engagements, for example, he put the 1st Division in the front line for seventy-two continuous days and nights, without divisional relief, at the battle of Picardy, when the Germans were driven through from St. Quentin to Montdidier. Again, at the second battle of the Marne, which began July 18, 1918, and was the turning point of the entire war, Pershing put the 1st Division practically directly at the hinge of this great door movement, at Soissons, only one French division being on the inside of it, and the 2d Soissons, only one French division being on the inside of it, and the 2d Division, containing the much advertised marines, were placed two whole divisions farther away from the hinge of our right. Again, it was the 1st Division that Pershing gave the post of honor, the inside position, just east of dangerous Mont Sec, when the St. Mihiel salient was closed.

The division captured 165 officers and 6,304 men, numerous machine guns, pieces of artillery of all calibers and a great quantity of supplies. Casualties 23,974, including 106 prisoners. The 1st Division made a total advance against resistance of fifty-one kilometers. Distinguished Service Crosses awarded to individuals of the division, 300.

The commanding generals of the division were as follows: Major General William L. Sibert, June 8, 1917 to December 12, 1917; Major General Robert L. Bullard, December 12, 1917 until he became a corps command. On March 15, 1919, Major General E. F. McGlachlin, Jr. was in command of the division.

The following units composed the division: the 16th, 18th, 26th, 28th Infantry Regiments; 5th, 6th, 7th Artillery Regiments; 1st Engineer Regiment and Train; 2d Field Signal Battalion; 3d, 4th, 5th Ambulance Companies and Field Hospital.


Second Division (Regular Army and Marines)

Insignia, an Indian head on star background and shield with colors varying according to unit. Division was organized from elements of the Regular Army and Marines in France during the last three months of 1917. After a period of training with the division headquarters at Bourmont, Haute-Marne, from October 26, 1917, to March 16, 1918, the division entered the Verdun and Toul sectors with headquarters at Sommedieu. Constant patrolling and several enemy raids repulsed. On May 31st moved in to the Chateau-Thierry sector, passing from the 7th A. C. French to the 21st A. C. French as reserve. Went forward about June 1, 1918, to meet a strong enemy attack which had developed on the line west of Chateau-Thierry. The attack of June 3d and 4th was halted June 4th on the line west of Chateau-Thierry and the division advanced two kilometers in the neighborhood of Vaux and in the Belleau Woods, between June 6th and July 1st. The relief of the division was completed July 9th. On July 16th the division entred the sector south of Soissons and attacked on the morning of the 18th and again on the morning of the 19th, advancing a total distance of eleven kilometers after severe fighting. On July 20th the division moved into reserve position and left the sector. On August 9th the division entered the Marbach sector. This was a quiet sector. Relieved August 24th. Entered the line on the St. Mihiel salient, September 9th, withdrawing September 16th, after having advanced approximately nine kilometers. Entered the front line of the Blanc Mont sector near Somme Py under the French. Relieved October 27th. Entered Meuse-Argonne sector on October 30th and attacked November 1st, advancing to the Meuse. Relieved after declaration of armistice. The division had made an advance of twenty-nine kilometers. Formed part of Army of Occupation.

Some of the units of the division, as a part of the 1st Division, left the United States in June, 1917. The division captured 228 officers, 11,738 men, 343 pieces of artillery, 1,350 machine guns and made a total advance of sixty kilometers against resistance.

The units composing the division were the 9th and 23rd Inf., 5th and 6th Marine Corps regiments, 12th and 15th and 17th Art. Regts., 4th, 5th and 6th Machine Gun Bns., 2d Trench Mortar Battery, 1st Fld. Sig. Bn., 2nd Eng. Regt. And Train, 1st, 15th, 16th and 23d Amb. Cos. And Field Hospital (composing 2nd Sanitary Train).

Commanding generals: Brig. Gen. Charles A. Doyon, U.S. Marine Corps to Oct. 24, 1917; Maj. Gen. Omar Bundy, Oct 15, 1917, to July 19, 1918; Brig. Gen. James Harbord, July 20 to Aug. 2, 1918; and Maj. Gen. John A. LeJeune Aug. 3 to Nov. 11, 1918.


Third Division (Regular Army)

The division insignia consists of three white stripes which stand for the three operations in which the 3d Division took part, the Marne, St. Mihiel and the Meuse-Argonne. The blue stands for the loyalty of those who placed their lives on the altar of self-sacrifice in defense of American ideals of liberty and democracy. The division is known as the Marne Division.

The division was organized on November 21, 1917, at Camp Greene, Charlotte, N.C. The first units sailed from the United States on April 4, 1918, and the last units arrived in France, May 30, 1918. The division went into the Chateau Villain training area. Part of the division entered the line at Chateau-Thierry and Hill 204, May 31st. The entire division entered the Chateau-Thierry sector in June. On July 15th they met the Germans who crossed the Marne. On July 21st the division attacked across the Marne east of Chateau-Thierry and advanced to the Ourcq, where it was relieved on July 29th. On September 10th the 3d Division entered the St. Mihiel sector and formed a part of the 4th Corps Reserve in the reduction of the St. Mihiel salient. Was relieved September 14th. The division entered the line September 30th in the Argonne offensive, relieving a line division and fought continuously until October 27th, when it was relieved north of Montfaucon. On November 14th the division entered the line on the right of the 3d American Army and marched to the Rhine via Conflans and Saarburg, where it occupied the Kreis of Mayon.

Battle casualties 16,356. Distinguished Service Crosses awarded to individuals of division, 233.

Commanding generals: Major-General Joseph T. Dickman, November 28, 1917 to February 26, 1918; Brigadier General James A. Irons, February 27 to March 18, 1918; Major General Joseph T. Dickman, April 12 to August 31, 1918; Major General Beaumont B. Buck, August 31 to October 17, 1918; Brigadier General Preston Brown, October 17 to November 11, 1918.

3rd Division Map
3rd Division Positions in the Meuse-Argonne Offensive September 30 to October 27, 1918

Fourth Division (Regular Army)

The division is known as the "Ivy Division," its shoulder insignia is a green four-leaved ivy, about a circle, in cross shape, superimposed upon a square olive drab diamond.

Organized at Camp Greene, Charlotte, North Carolina, on December 10, 1917. Began leaving Camp Green April 18, 1918, by way of Camp Merritt and Camp Mills. Overseas movement began May 1, 1918. By June 3d, all organizations, except artillery, were in the Samer area for training with the British. The artillery trained at Camp de Souge. On June 9, 1918, the division moved to the Meaux and vicinity and on June 15th moved to LaFerte, being at the disposal of the 164th French Infantry Division. Units of the division participated in the fighting around Haute-Vesnes, Courchamps, Chevillon, St. Gengoulph and Sommelans until Junly 22d, when the division was made reserve. Some of the infantry units were detached and put into the fighting with another American division.

The division went into the front line August 3d, advancing to the Vesle, and was relieved on night of August 11th, and on August 19th was withdrawn to the Reynel training area, and on September 1st all units were moved to Vavincourt for further training. On September 7th, troops of the 59th Infantry went into the line the Toul sector southeast of Verdun. The 59th Infantry was relieved September 15th and the entire division moved to woods near Lennes on night September 19th-20th. The division, as part of 3d Corps, attacked on the first day in the Meuse-Argonne offensive, September 26th, advancing six and a half kilometers the first day, and continued in this offensive until October 19th, when it was relieved while holding Bois de la Cote Lemont, and Bois de Brieulles. On October 20th the division was assigned to the 2nd Army; started to move to Vignot and Lucey areas on October 21st. On November 4th the division was assigned again to the 1st Army and started moving to Blercourt, November 6th, but was reassigned to the 2d Army on November 8th. The division returned to Void November 9th, attached to the 4th Corps. After signing of the armistice, the division concentrated around Bourcq November 13th and the Artillery Brigade, which had been kept in action almost continuously along the Meuse, rejoined the division November 14th. Began its march into Germany November 20th, under the 3d Army and on December 16th the division was occupying the Kreises of Adenau and Cochem, Province of the Rhine, as its permanent area of occupation.

Battle casaulties 12,948. Distinguished Service Crosses awarded, 66.

Commanding generals: Major-General George H. Cameron, December 10, 1917 to August 24, 1918; Brigadier-General Benjamin W. Poore, August 24 to August 31, 1918; Major-General John L. Hines, August 31 to October 17, 1918; Major General George H. Cameron, October 17 to October 24, 1918; Brigadier General Benjamin W. Poore, October 24 to November 7, 1918; Major General Mark L. Hersey, November 7 to November 11, 1918.


Fifth Division (Regular Army)

Shoulder insignia, a red diamond. The division was organized at Camp Logan, Texas in latter part of May, 1917. The first organization to leave for overseas, entrained for Camp Merritt about the first of March. Division headquarters arrived at Havre, France, May 1, 1918. Sent to the Bar-sur-Aube area for training; June 1st moved by rail to the Vosges. Entered the Colmar sector in conjunction with the 21st Division (French) and remained there until July 16th. The division then moved by bus to the St. Die sector, and on the 23d of August, moved by bus and road to the St. Mihiel sector. In the St. Mihiel operation this division was a part of the 1st Army Corps and was placed in the line northeast of Regnieville-en-Haye with the 2nd Division on their left and the 90th Division on their right. The division continued in the St. Mihiel offensive until September 16th when it moved by road and bus to the Argonne front and went into the attack on October 12th east of Montfaucon. The division continued in the attack until October 22d when it was relieved by the 90th Division, and was withdrawn to the vicinity of Malancourt. On October 27th the division was again brought into the attack southwest of Brieulles, crossed the Meuse river and took Dun-sur-Meuse and continued the attack until November 11th, when it had reached a position just south of Marville. On November 13th the division was moved back to the vicinity of Murvaux and on November 20th to Lion-Devant-Dun. When the 3d Army was formed this division constituted a part of the command and was marched to the vicinity of Longwy where it was placed in charge of the lines of communication, taking over the control of the territory in its area. On December 8th the division marched to vicinity of Remich, Luxembourg and upon arrival there was placed under command of the 2d Army.

The division was made up from the 6th, 11th, 60th and 61st Regular Army Infantry Regiments. (The 60th and 61st Infantry were organized from the old 7th Infantry). The 19th and 20th Field Artillery, organized from the old 7th Field Artillery; the 21st Field Artillery, organized from the old 3d Field Artillery; the 7th Engineering Regiment organized from Companies E and F of the 1st Engineers and the 9th Field Signal Battalion organized from personnel of the Signal Corps of the Regular Army. The 13th, 14th and 15th Machine Gun Battalions; 5th Trench Mortar Battery; 5th Headquarters Trains and Military Police; 5th Ammunition Train; 5th Sanitary Train were organized from Regular Army and National Army drafts.

The division captured from the enemy the following: 2,405 prisoners, ninety-eight pieces of artillery, 802 machine guns and made a total advance of twenty-nine kilometers against resistance. Battle losses: killed, 1908, wounded, 7,975, prisoners of war, ninety-eight men. Distinguished Service Crosses awarded, 163.

Major General James E. McMahon, U.S.A. commanded this division from December 13, 1917 until October 24, 1918; Major-General Hanson E. Ely from October 24 to November 11th.


Sixth Division

The shoulder insignia of the division is a six pointed star of red with the numeral "6" in blue superimposed on the center of the star. Popularly known as the "Star Division." Organized at Camp Forest, Ga., and Camp McClellan, Ala., on November 26, 1917. On March 13, 1918, headquarters moved to Camp Forrest, Ga., and later left on May 8th and was established at Camp Wadsworth, S.C. Practically every state iin the Union was represented in the volunteer personnel of the division; however, the majority of the men were from the South.

The division, less artillery and engineers began embarking from New York on May 8, 1918, and began debaking in Englnd on July 17th, the last units arriving in France, August 28, 1918. From England the troops were transported to France, beginning July 21st, debarking at LeHavre. Preceding the division, the engineers arrived on May 18th at Brest, and were engaged in construction work at Gievres before joining the division in August near Chateauvillain. The artillery landed at Le Havre on July 29th and began its training at Valdahon.

After training in the vicinity of Chateauvillain, the division, less artillery, left on August 27, 1918, for Gerardmer where it occupied, under French command, a sector in the Vosages until October 11, 1918. On October 27th the division was moved from Gerardmer by rail to the vicinity of Les Islettes and established headquarters at Beauchamp Farm. On November 2, 1918, the division began to march forward in the Meuse-Argonne offensive. On November 6th, headquarters was established at Stonne. Marched to a sector northeast of Verdun and entered the line on November 14th. Relieved on November 21st, and proceeded to the 14th training area. November 30th, the division headquarters was established at Aignay-le-Duc.

Battle causalties, 285, of which three were prisoners of war. Distinguished Service Crosses awarded, ten.

Commanding generals: Brigadier General James B. Erwin, November 26, 1917 to August 31, 1918; Major General Walter P. Gordon, August 31 to November 11, 1918.

The 6th Division was composed of the following units: 11th and 12th Infantry Brigades, 51st, 52nd, 53rd, 54th Infantry Regimetns, 17th and 18th Machine Gun Battaliosn, (6th Artillery Brigade), 3d, 11th and 78th Artillery Regiments, 6th Trench Mortar Battery, 16th Div. Machine Gun Battalion, 318th Engineer Regiment and Train, 6th Field Signal Battalion, 6th Train Headquarters and Military Police, 6th Supply Train, 6th Ammunition Train, 6th Sanitary Train, 20th, 37th, 38th, 40th Ambulance Companies and Field Hospitals.


Seventh Division (Regular Army)

Insignia, two triangles with apexes touching, in black, on red circular base. Organized at Chickamauga Park, Ga., January 1, 1918. Division headquarters arrived at Camp MacArthur, Waco, Texas, February 5, 1918, at which time the division began assembling and training. Began leaving Camp MacArthur for Camp Merritt, N.J., July 18, 1918. Sailed from Hoboken, N.J. on July 31st. 14th Brigade followed during the next two weeks. The last units arrived in France on September 3, 1918. On August 19th the division arrived in 15th training area with headquarters at Ancy-le-Franc. Entire division (less artillery) arried in training area by September 20th. Moved to Toul area September 30th with headquarters at Gondreville. Engaged in training and equipping.

Relief of the 90th Division was completed October 10th and 11th, in the Puvenelle sector. Division headquarters moved from Gondreville to Villers-en-Haye. 5th Field Artillery Brigade assigned to support of the 7th Division. Defensive occupation of this sector from October 10th to November 9th. Offensive occupation of this sector to November 11th. Participated in the 2nd Army offensive. On January 3, 1919, the 5th Field Artillery Brigade was relieved from the 7th Division. On January 10th the division headquarters moved from Euvezin to Saizerais. Units of the division moved south from battle area and engaged in active training. (The 7th Field Artillery Brigade trained at Camp Meucon; did not join division until February, 1919.)

During the operations of the division, one officer and sixty-eight men, twenty-eight machine guns and numerous supplies were captured from the enemy. This division made a total advance into enemy territory of three-fourths of a kilometer. Battle losses 1,546 casualties, of which three were prisoners of war. Distinguished Service Crosses awarded, thirty.

Commanding generals: Brigadier General C.H. Barth, August 10 to October 24, 1918; Major General Edmund Wittenmeyer, October 24 to November 11, 1918.

The units composing the division are as follows: 13th Infantry Brigade, 55th, 56th Infantry Regiments, 20th Machine Gun Battalion, 14th Infantry Brigade, 34th, 64th Infantry Regiments, 21st Machine Gun Battalion, 19th Divisinal Machine Gun Battalion, 7th Artillery Brigade, 8th, 79th and 80th Artillery Regiments, 7th Trench Mortar Battery, 5th Engineer Regiment and Train, 10th Field Signal Battalion, 7th Training Headquarters and Military Police, 7th Supply Train, 7th Ammunition Train, 7th Sanitary Train, consisting of the 22nd, 34th, 35th and 36th Amublance Companies and Field Hospitals.


Eighth Division (Regular Army)

Insignia, a black Indian head with an orange circle. Popularly known as the "Pathfinder Division." Organized at Camp Fremont, Cal., December 17, 1917. During the latter part of August, 1918, some five thousand men and nearly one hundred officers were transferred from the 8th Division to the American Expeditionary Force in Siberia with Major-General William S. Graves. Major-General Eli A. Helmick then took command of the division which was filled up with recruits and on October 18, 1918, the division started to move to Camp Mills, Long Island. The 8th Division started to embark from Hoboken, October 30th. The 8th Artillery Brigade, including the 2nd, 81st and 83rd Field Artillery regiments: 8th Trench Mortar Battery; 16th Infantry Brigade headquarters and the 8th Infantry with division headquarters were the only units landed in France. None saw action. Following the armistice the division was demobilized through various camps.

The following units composed the division: 8th Division Headquarters, Headquarters Troop and Detachment; 15th and 16th Infantry Brigades; the 12th, 62nd, 8th and 13th Infantry Regiments; the 22nd 23rd and 24th Machine Gun Battalions; the 8th Field Artillery Brigade composed of the 8th Trench Mortar Battery, the 8th Ammunition Train, and the 2d, 81st and 83rd Regiments of Field Artillery; the 319th Engineer Regiment and Train; the 320th Field Signal Battalion; the 8th Train Headquarters and Military Police; the 8th Supply Train; the 8th Sanitary Train, consisting of the 11th, 31st, 32nd and 43rd Ambulance and Field Hospital Companies.


Ninth Division (Regular Army)

Organized at Camp Sheridan, Alabama, July 8, 1918. The division was composed of Regular Army and National Army troops; the National Army drafts coming mostly from New England and the middle west. The 45th and 46th Regular Army Infantry Regiments consitituted the nucleus of the infantry units of the division and part of their personnel was transferred to the 67th and 68th Infantry Regiments to form a basis on which these regiments were organized. The Artillery Brigade was organized at Camp McClellan, Alabama, on August 1, 1918, under the command of Colonel J. E. Myers. On October 29, 1918, Brigadier General William Bryden assumed command of the brigade and remained in command until demobilization.

This division was not sent to France but just previous to the armistice had received orders to prepare for movement overseas and advanced school detachment had been sent to the port of embarkation. After the armistice the division resumed its training until the end of January when the temporary officer and national army personnel were demobilized.

Major-General Willard A. Holbrook commanded the 9th Division from the time of its organization.

This division was composed of the following organizations: 17th and 18th Infantry Brigades, 9th Field Artillery Brigade, 45th, 67th, and 68th Infantry Regiments, 25th, 26th, and 27th Machine Gun Battalions, 25th, 26th and 27th Field Artillery Regiments, 9th Trench Mortar Battery, 209th Regiment Engineers and Train, 209th Field Signal Battalion, 209th Headquarters Train and Military Police, 209th Supply Train, 209th Ammunition Train, 209th Sanitary Train (consisting of Field Hospital and Ambulance Companies Nos. 233, 234, 235 and 236).


Tenth Division (Regular Army)

Insignia, a blue square with a yellow "X" superimposed inside a yellow ring.

Organized at Camp Funston, Kansas. Began regular training on August 10, 1918. The advanced school detachment left Camp Funston on October 27, 1918, and arrived in France just prior to the signing of the armistice. The 210th Engineer Regiment and Train left for Camp Mills on November 1, 1918, and was ready for movement overseas. On January 18, 1919, demobilization was commenced and on February 18th all organizations fo the 10th Division were demobilized except those belonging to the Regular Army.

Major General Leonard Wood commanded this division from the time of its organization until it was demobilized.

The division was composed of the following organizations: 10th Headquarters Troop, 28th Divisional Machine Gun Battalion, 19th Infantry Brigade, 41st Infantry Regiment, 69th Infantry Regiment, 29th Machine Gun Battalion, 20th Infantry Brigade, 20th Infantry Regiment, 70th Infantry Regiment, 30th Machine Gun Battalion, 10th Field Artillery Brigade, 28th Field Artillery Regiment, 29th Field Artillery Regiment, 30th Field Artillery Regiment, 10th Trench Mortar Battery, 210th Engineer Regiment, 210th Engineer Train, 10th Train Headquarters and Military Police, 10th Supply Train, 10th Sanitary Train, 237th Field Hospital, 238th Field Hospital, 239th Field Hospital, 240th Field Hospital, 237th Ambulance Company, 238th Ambulance Company, 239th Ambulance Company, 240th Ambulance Company.


Eleventh Division (Regular Army)

Known as the Lafayette Division. Insignia, a silhouette bust of Lafayette in blue, superimposed on a red disc. Organized at Camp Meade, Maryland, in August, 1918. The 17th Infantry, on duty in the Southern Department, and the 63d Infantry, stationed at Presidio, San Francisco, California, and certain detachments for special units were ordered to Camp Meade to form a nucleus around which the 11th Division was to be formed. There were taken from each company of these two regiments certain non-commissioned officers and privates who were assigned to the 71st and 72nd Infantry Regiments to start their organization. The 24th Field Artillery Brigade was trained at West Point, Kentucky, and never actually joined the division at Camp Meade.

Immediately after its organization the division began a course of intensive training in preparation for service overseas. On October 25, 1918, the division advanced school detachment departed for overseas and arrived at Liverpool, England, on November 8th. On November 11th when the armistice was signed, the division was fully equipped and all preparations had been made for movement overseas. On November 29, 1918, the division was broken up and all organizations not belonging to the Regular Army were demobilized.

Major General Jesse McI. Carter commanded the division from the time it was organized until demobilization.

The division was composed of the following organizations: 11th Div., Hqs. Troop, 31st Div. Machine Gun Bn., 21st Inf. Brig. (17th and 71st Inf. Regts., 32d Machine Gun Bn.), 22nd Inf. Brig. (62rd and 72nd Inf. Regts., 33rd Machine Gun Bn.), 24th Fld. Arty. Brig. (70th, 71st, and 72nd Fld. Arty. Regts., 24th Trench Mortar Battery, 211th Engr. Regt. And Train, 211th Fld. Sig. Bn., 211th Train Hqs., and M.P., 211th Supply Train, 211th Amm. Train, 211th Sanitary Train (Field Hospitals and Amb. Cos. Nos. 341, 342, 343 and 344).


Twelfth Division (Regular Army)

Popularly known as the Plymouth Division and its shoulder insignia was a blue diamond with a red center and the figure "12" in white pierced by a bayonet. Organized at Camp Devens, Mass., July 12, 1918. The 36th and 42nd Regular Army Infantry Regiments were ordered to Camp Devens in the latter part of July as a part of the 12th Division. There were taken from each company of these two regiments a certain number of non-commissioned officers and privates who were assigned to the 73rd and 74th National Army Regiments as a nucleus. The 12th Field Artillery Brigade, the divisional artillery of this division, was organized and trained at Camp McClellan, Ala., and never actually joined the division at Camp Devens. By the 1st of September the training of the division for overseas service was well under way. At the time the armistice was signed the division had received for the demobilization of the division, and by January 31st the entire commissioned and enlisted personnel not in the regular establishment had been discharged.

Major-General Henry P. McCain commanded this division from the time of its organization until it was demobilized.

This division was composed of the following organizations: 12th Div. Hqs. Troop, 34th Div. Machine Gun Bn., 23rd Inf. Brig. (36th and 73rd Inf. Regts, 35th Machine Gun Bn.,) 24th Inf. Brig. (42d and 74th Inf. Regts, 36th Machine Gun Bn.), 12th Fld. Arty. Brig. (34th, 35th, 36th Fld. Arty Regts., 12th Trench Mortar Battery), 212th Engr. Regt. And Train, 212th Fld. Sig. Bn., 12th Hqs. Train, and M.P., 12th Supply Train, 12th Amm. Train, 12th Sanitary Train (consisting of 245th, 246th, 247th and 248th Amb. Cos. And Field Hospitals).


Thirteenth Division (Regular Army)

Insignia, a disc of blue cloth on which is superimposed a red horse shoe with the opening to the top. In this opening is a figure of a black cat and underneath the figure are the numerals 13 in white block figures. Organized at Camp Lewis, American Lake, Washington, July, 1918. The 1st and 44th Regular Army Infantry Regiments were already stationed at Camp Lewis, and a certain number of non-commissioned officers and enlisted men were transferred to form the nucleus of the 75th and 76th Infantry Regiments. The personnel of the division consisted mostly of the selective service quotas of August and September. Intensive training was begun immediately and by the 1st of November the division was equipped and ready for overseas service. On January 19, 1919, orders were issued for the demobilization of the division and in the early part of March all commissioned and enlisted personnel except those belonging to the regular establishment had been discharged or transferred.

Major General Joseph D. Leitch was the commanding general of this division.

This division consisted of the following organizations: 13th Div. Hqs., Troop, 25th Inf. Brig. (1st and 75th Inf., 38th Machine Gun Bn.), 26th Inf. Brig. (44th and 76th Inf., 39th Machine Gun Bn.), 13th Fld. Arty. Brig. (37th, 38th, and 39th Fld. Arty.), 213th Engr. Regt. And Train, 213th Fld. Sig. Bn., 13th Train Hqs and M.P., 13th Supply Train, 13th Trench Mortar Battery, 13th Amm. Train, 13th Sanitary Train (249th, 250th, 251st and 252d Field Hospitals and Amb. Cos.)


Fourteenth Division (Regular Army)

Popularly known as the "Wolverine Division." Insignia, a green shield upon which is superimposed a yellow disc containing the head of a wolverine in black. Organized at Camp Custer, Michigan, on July 29, 1918. The 10th and 40th Regular Army Infantry Regiments were ordered to Camp Custer in the latter part of July as a part of the 14th Division and these regiments furnished the nucleus for the organization of the other infantry units of the division. The artillery brigade was organized on August 10, 1918, and training for overseas service was begun immediately. The 214th Regiment of Engineers was organized at Camp Forest, Ga., on August 14, 1918, and training for overseas service was began immediately. The 214th Regiment of Engineers was organized at Camp Forest, Ga., on August 14, 1918, and joined the division at Camp Custer on October 31, 1918. The 214th Field Signal Battalion was organized on July 13, 1918 at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas, and arrived at Camp Custer on July 25, 1918. All other units of the division were organized and undergoing intensive training at Camp Custer by the first week in November and at the time of the signing of the armistice the division was being rounded into shape for service at the front. Demobilization of the division was commenced January 27, 1919, and by the last of February all units not belonging to the Regular Army had been demobilized.

Commanders of division: Col. Sam. Burkhardt, July 28 to Sept. 5, 1918; Brig. Gen. H. L. Laubach, Sept. 5 to Nov. 9, 1918; Maj.Gen. Grote Hutcheson, Nov. 9 until demobilization.

The division was composed of the following organizations: 14th Hqs. Troop, 40th Div. Machine Gun Bn., 27th Inf. Brig. (10th and 77th Inf. Regts, 41st Machine Gun Bn.), 28th Inf. Brig (40th and 78th Inf. Regts, 42nd Machine Gun Bn), 14th Fld. Arty. Brig. (40th, 41st, and 42nd Fld. Arty. Regts. 14th Trench Mortar Battery, 214th Engr. Regt., 214th Engr. Train, 214th Fld. Sig. Bn., 14th Train Hqs and M.P., 14th Supply Train, 14th Sanitary Train (Field Hospitals and Amb. Cos. 253, 254, 255, and 256).


Fifteenth Division (Regular Army)

Insignia, a white rattlesnake. Organized at Camp Logan, Texas, on Aug. 28, 1918. The 43d and 57th Regular Army Infantry Regiments which were stationed at Camp Logan furnished the nucleus for the other infantry units of the division. The divisional artillery was organized at Camp Stanley, Texas, from National Army cavalry and remained at that camp for instruction. The engineer regiment and train was organized at Camp Humphries, Va., and joined the division at Camp Logan in the early part of November. By the 1st of November the organization of the division was about completed and all units were undergoing intensive training. On Dec. 4th the breaking up of the division was begun, when one battalion of the 43d Infantry was sent to Camp Bowie, Texas, and one battalion to Camp MacArthur, Texas. On Dec. 18th the 57th Infantry entrained for Camp Pike, Arkansas. By the middle of Feb., 1919, all organizations of the 15th Division not belonging to the Regular Army had been demobilized.

Commanders of the division: Col. D. J. Baker, Aug. 28 to Sept. 11, 1918; Brig. Gen. Guy V. Henry, Sept. 11, 1918, until demobilization.

The division was composed of the following organizations: 15th Hqs. Troops; 29th, 30th Inf. Brigs.; 43d, 79th, 57th, 80th Inf.; 43d, 44th, 45th Machine Gun Bns; 15th Arty. Brig. (43d, 44th, 45th Fld. Arty., 15th Trench Mortar Battery, 15th Amm. Train); 215th Fld. Sig. Bn.; 215th Engr. Regt. And Train; 15th Train Hqs. And M.P.; 15th Supply Train; 15th Sanitary Train (Field Hospitals and Amb. Cos. Nos. 257, 258, 259 and 260).


Sixteenth Division (Regular Army)

Organized at Camp Kearny, California, in the early part of Aug., 1918. The 21st and 32d Regular Army Infantry Regiments were ordered to Camp Kearny as a part of this division and these two regiments furnished the nucleus for the organization of the other infantry regiments of the division. The artillery brigade was organized on Sept. 13, 1918, from the 301st and 302nd Regiments of cavalry. The engineer regiment was organized at Camp Humphries, Va., on Sept. 28, 1918, and joined the division at Camp Kearny and by the 1st of Oct., 1918, the division was undergoing intensive training in preparation for service overseas. Demobilization of the division was commenced in the middle of February and all organizations not belonging to the Regular Army were demobilized by March 8, 1919.

Maj. Gen. David C. Shanks was the commanding general.

The division was composed of the following organizations: 16th Hqs. Troops; 31st, 32d Inf. Brigs.; 31st, 81st, 32nd, 82nd Inf.; 46th, 47th, 48th Machine Gun Bn.; 16th Field Arty. Brig. (46th, 47th and 48th Fld. Arty., 16th Trench Mortar Battery); 216th Engr. Regt. And Train; 216th Fld.Sig. Bn.; 16th Train Hqs. And M.P.; 16th Amm Train; 16th Sanitary Train (Field Hospitals and Amb. Cos. Nos. 261, 262, 263, and 264).


Seventeenth Division (Regular Army)

Popularly known as the "Thunderbolt Division." A distinctive shoulder insignia was not adopted. Organized at Camp Beauregard, Alexandria, La., in the early part of August, 1918. The 5th and 29th Regular Army Infantry Regiments were ordered to Camp Beauregard as a part of this division and these two regiments furnished the nucleus for the organization of two other infantry regiments of the division. The artillery brigade of the division was organized at Camp Bowie, Texas, and never actually joined the division at Camp Beauregard. The engineer regiment of the division was organized at Camp Humphries, Va., and joined the division at Camp Beauregard on Nov. 7, 1918. The majority of the units of the division were organized by the 1st of November and underwent intensive training in preparation for service overseas. Demobilization of the division was begun on Jan. 18, 1919, and all organizations not belonging to the Regular Army had been demobilized by Jan. 31, 1919.

Commanders of the division: Col. H. E. Jackson, Aug. 6, 1918, to Sept. 1, 1918; Col. James A. Irons, Sept. 1 to Nov. 1, 1918; Brig. Gen. Robert W. Mearns, Nov. 1, 1918 to Jan. 8, 1919; Maj. Gen. Henry C. Hodges, Jr. Jan. 8, 1919 until demobilization.

The division was composed of the following organizations: 17th Hqs. Troops; 33d, 34th Inf. Brigs.; 5th, 83d, 29th 84th Inf.; 49th, 50th, 51st Machine Gun Bn.; 17th Arty. Brig. (49th, 50th, 51st Fld. Arty., 17th Trench Mortar Battery); 217th Engr. Regt. And Train; 217th Fld. Sig. Bn.; 17th Train Hqs., and M.P.; 17th Supply Train; 17th Amm. Train; 17th Sanitary Train (Field Hospitals and Amb. Cos. 265, 266, 267 and 268).


Eighteenth Division (Regular Army)

Insignia, the figure "18" superimposed on a green cactus plant, under which is written "Noli me tangere." Organized at Camp Travis, Texas on August 21, 1918. The 19th and 35th Regular Army Infantry Regiments were assigned to this division and these regiments furnished the nucleus for the organization of the other two infantry regiments of the division. The artillery brigade of this division was organized at Camp Stanley, Leon Springs, Texas, on August 14, 1918., from the 303d, 304th and 305th National Army Cavalry Regiments. This brigade joined the 18th Division at Camp Travis at the end of August. The engineer regiment of the division was organized at Camp Humphries in the early part of September, 1918, and joined the division at Camp Travis on November 9, 1918. All units of the division except the engineer train were organized by the middle of October and undergoing intensive training in preparation for service overseas. Demobilization of the division commenced on January 17, 1919, and demobilization of all organizations except those belonging to the Regular Army was completed of February 14, 1919.

Brigadier General G. H. Estes was the commanding general.

The division was composed of the following organizations: 18th Hqs. Troop, 52d Machine Gun Bn., 35th Inf. Brig. (19th and 85th Inf., 53d Machine Gun Bn.), 36th Inf. Brig. (35th and 36th Inf, 54th Machine Gun Bn.), 18th Fld. Arty. Brig. (52d, 53d, and 54th Fld. Arty., 18th Trench Mortar Battery), 218th Engrs., 18th Train Hqs., and M.P., 18th Amm. Train, 18th Supply Train, 18th Sanitary Train (Field Hospitals and Amb. Cos. No. 269, 270, 271 and 272).


Nineteenth Division (Regular Army)

Popularly known as the "Twilight Division." Insignia, black triangle with white tips on a red circle on a khaki ground. Organized at Camp Dodge, Iowa, September 1, 1918. The 2d and 14th Regular Army Infantry Regiments were assigned to this division and these regiments furnished the nucleus for the organization of the other two infantry regiments of the division. The artillery brigade of the division was organized at Camp Bowie, Texas, on August 14, 1918, from the 307th and 309th National Army Cavalry Regiments. In the early part of October the artillery brigade was ordered to Fort Sill, Okla., for training at the Field Artillery Brigade Firing Center. The brigade never actually joined the division at Camp Bowie. The engineer regiment was organized at Camp Humphreys, Va., on September 26, 1918. It remained in training at Camp Humphreys until the first of November when it joined the division at Camp Dodge. All other units of the division were organized and undergoing intensive training by the end of October and at the time of the signing of the armistice, the division was being rounded into shape for service overseas. Demobilization of the division was commenced on January 23, 1919, and all organizations not belonging to the Regular Army were demobilized by January 29, 1919.

Commanders of division: Col. W. C. Bennett, September 1, 1918 to September 26, 1918; Col. Armand I. Lasseigne, September 26 to Oct. 25, 1918; Brig. Gen. Benjamin T. Simmons, Oct. 25, 1918, until demobilization.

This division was composed of the following organizations: 19th Hqs. Troop, 55th Machine Gun Bn., 37th Inf. Brig., (14th and 87th Inf., 56th Machine Gun Bn.), 38th Inf. Brig. (2nd and 88th Inf., 57th Machine Gun Bn.), 19th Fld. Arty. Brig. (55th, 56th and 57th Fld. Arty.), 19th Trench Mortar Battery, 219th Engr. Regt. And Train, 19th Train Hqs. And M.P., 19th Supply Train, 19th Amm. Train, 19th Sanitary Train (Field Hospitals and Amb. Cos. Nos. 273, 274, 275 and 276).


Twentieth Division (Regular Army)

Organized at Camp Sevier, S.C., on Aug. 12, 1918. The 48th and 50th Regular Army Infantry Regiments were assigned to this division and these regiments furnished the nucleus for the organization of the other two infantry regiments of the division. The artillery brigade of the division was organized at Camp Jackson, S.C., and never actually joined the division at Camp Sevier. The organization of the division was about completed at the end of October and all units were undergoing intensive training in preparation for overseas service. All organizations not belonging to the Regular Army were demobilized by Feb. 28, 1919.

Commanders of division: Col. Louis J. VanSchaick, Aug. 9 to Aug. 18, 1918; Col. Lawrence B. Simonds, Aug. 18 to Aug. 27, 1918; Col. Wm. F. Grote, Aug. 27 to Sept. 30, 1918; Brig. Gen. F. Leroy Sweetser, Sept. 30th until demobilization.

This division was composed of the following organizations: 20th Hqs. Troop; 39th, 40th Inf. Bn.; 48th, 89th, 50th, 90th Inf.; 58th, 59th 60th Machine Gun Bns.; 20th Fld. Arty. Brig. (58th, 59th, 60th Fld. Arty., 20th Trench Mortar Battery); 220th Engr. Regt. And Train; 20th Amm. Train; 20th Sanitary Train (Field Hospitals and Amb. Cos. Nos. 277, 278, 279, and 280).


Twenty-Sixth Division (National Guard)

The division received the popular name of "Yankee Division." Its shoulder insignia is a blue monogram YD superimposed on a diamond of khaki. Organized August 22, 1917, in Boston, Mass. Units of this division were made up from the National Guard troops of the New England States (Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Mass., Rhode Island, and Connecticut), together with a contingent of National Army troops from Camp Devens. The first units sailed for France, Sept. 7, 1917, and during Sept. And Oct., 1917, the division was transported to France, through both English and French ports. Division headquarters was established at Neufchateau, France, Oct. 31st. The division went into the line in the Chemin des Dames sector Feb. 6, 1918, was relieved from that sector March 18th, and moved to the La Reine sector northwest of Toul, entering the sector March 31st. The division left this sector June 28th and moved by rail to area east of Meaux. From July 5th to 18th, the division marched to support position behind line Torcy-Bois de Belleau-Vaux, northwest of Chateau-Thierry and took over the Pas Fini sector.

From July 18th to 25th it attacked, as a unit of the 1st Corps in the Aisne-Marne offensive (second Battle of the Marne), penetrating to a depth of seventeen kilometers. Was relieved July 25th and marched to an area in vicinity of La Ferte. It then moved by rail on Aug. 1st to 3d, to Chatillon training area. On Aug. 25th the division moved to area north of Bar-le-Duc and from there by marching to the Troyon sector where it entered the line. On Sept. 12th the division attacked in the St. Mihiel salient, penetrating as far as Vigneulles. On Oct. 8th, the division moved to consolidated vicinity of Vedun as army reserve. The division was engaged in operations north of Verdun from Oct. 18th to Nov. 11th. The division was relieved and proceeded to the eighth training area where headquarters was established at Montigny-le-Roi, Nov. 23d.

The following National Guard units were absorbed in forming division:

Maine: 2d Inf., 1st Regt. Heavy F.A., 1-13 Co., C.D.C.

New Hampshire: 1st Inf. M.G. Troop Cav. Btry. A, F.A., Co. B, S.C.; Fld Hosp. Co. No. 1 to 4th Cos. C.A.C.

Vermont: 1st Inf.

Massachusetts: 2nd, 5th, 6th, 8th, 9th Inf.; Hqs. 2d Brig; 1st Sq. Cav.; 1st and 2nd Regts. F.A.; 1st Regt. Engrs.; Amb. Cos. 1 and 2; 1st F.S. Bn.; 1st to 12th Cos. C.A.C.

Rhode Island: 1st Sept. Sq. Cav.; 1st Bn. F.A., Amb. Co. No.1
Connecticut: 1st and 2nd Inf.; 1st Sq. Cav.; Btrys. E and F, F.A.; Amb. Co., No. 1, Fld. Hosp. No. 1

Division commanders: Brig. Gen. Peter E. Traub, Oct. 31 to Nov. 11, 1917; Maj. Gen. Clarence R. Edwards, Nov. 11, 1917 to Oct. 24, 1918; Brig. Gen. Frank E. Bamford, Oct. 24, 1918, and in command Nov. 11th

The following units composed the division: 51st and 52d Inf. Brigs.; 101st, 102d, 103d, 104th Regts. Inf.; 102d, 103d Machine Gun Bns.; 51st Arty. Brig., 101st, 102nd, 103d Arty. Regts.; 101st Trench Mortar Btry; 101st Div. Machine Gun Bn.; 101st Engr. Regt. And Train; 101st Fld. Sig. Bn., 101st Train Hqs., and M.P.; 101st Supply Train; 101st Amm. Train; 101st Sanitary Train, 101st, 102d, 103d and 104th Amb. Cos., and Fld. Hosps.

This division captured from the enemy the following: 61 officers; 3,087 men; 16 pieces of artillery; 132 machine guns and numerous supplies. The division made a total advance against resistance of thirty-seven kilometers; 14,411 replacements were furnished this division. Battle deaths, 2,168, wounded 13,000; Prisoners of war, 451. Distinguished Service Cross awards, 229.


Twenty-seventh Division (National Guard)

Insignia, a black circle with a red border in which are the leters NYD in monogram, surrounded by the seven stars of the constellation Orion. Organized at Camp Wadsworth, S.C., in Sept. 1917. The New York National Guard as its nucleus, the following units being used: 1st, 2d, 3d, 7th, 12th, 14th, 23d, 71st and 74th N.Y. Inf., Squadron A, 1st N.Y. Cav.; 1st, 3d N.Y. Fld. Arty.; 22d N.Y. Engrs; 1st Bn. N.Y. Sig. Corps; N.Y. Amm. Train; N.Y. Supply Train; N.Y. Sanitary Train; N.Y. Hqs and M.P., 6th N.Y. Div. Hqs. Troop.

The division embarked for overseas at Newport News, Va., the first units sailing on May 8th, and the last arriving in France, July 7, 1918. It was ordered to a training area and later entered the line with the British units opposite Mt. Kemmel. On Aug. 20th a moved was made to the Dickebush sector, Belgium, which was occupied next day. On Aug. 31st the division was a front-line division in the attack on Vierstandt Ridge, the 30th Division on its left - 34th British Division on its right. As part of the 2d Corps (U.S.) 4th British Army, the division was in action near Bony, Sept. 24th to Oct. 1st. On Oct. 12th it again entered the line in the St. Soupiet sector crossing the Seille River in the attack on Jonc de Mer Ridge.

Maj. Gen. John O'Ryan, N.Y. National Guard, commanded the division from its organization until mustered out.

The division captured from the enemy the following: 2,358 prisoners and advanceed eleven kilometers against resistance. During active operations it suffered the following loses: Killed, 1,791; wounded, 9.427; prisoners three officers and 225 men. One hundred and thirty-nine Distinguished Service Crosses awarded.

The following organizations composed the division: 105th, 106th, 107th, 108th, Regts. Inf.; 104th, 105th, 106th Machine Gun Bns.; 104th, 105th, 106th Fld. Arty. Regts.; 102d Trench Mortar Battery; 102d Engrs.; 102d Fld. Sig. Bn.; 102d Hqs Train and M.P., 102d Amm. Train; 102d Supply Train; 102d Engr. Train; 102d Sanitary Train (105th, 106th, 107th, 108th Amb. Cos. And Field Hospitals).


Twenty-eighth Division (National Guard)

28th Division PatchKnown as the "Keystone Division." Insignia, a red keystone. Organized from units of the Pennsylvania National Guard at Camp Hancock, Ga., August 5, 1917. The majority of the officers and enlisted men were from the State of Pennsylvania. On November 15th the division was reorganized to conform to the new Tables of Organization.

The division commenced leaving the States April 21, 1918, moving through Camp Upton. It landed at Calais May 18th and trained with the British in the vicinity of Nielles les Blequin for about two weeks. It then moved to Gonesse where it trained with the French for another two weeks' period, and then moved to a sector near the Marne.

On July 1, 1918, two platoons of the 11th Infantry took part in an attack on hill 204. On July 16th part of the infantry entered the line on the Marne River and the entire division was in sector on the Ourcq river by July 27, 1918.

The division was relieved on the night of July 30th-31st, and from then to August 6th was in rest in the vicinity of Jaulgonne on the Marne. On the night of August 6th-7th, it again entered the line on the Vesle river, the sector extending from about Courlandon on the east to Fismes on the west. Here it remained actively engaged until Sept. 8th, when it was relieved by a French division.

Upon relief of the division, it moved to a position south of the Argonne forest, and on Sept. 20th took part of the sector extending from Boureuilles on the east to Cote 285 on the west. It was one of the attacking divisions in the offensive of Sept. 26th, pushing as far as Chatel Chehery, where it was relieved on Oct. 9th. It then moved by bus to an area northeast of Commercy.

On Oct. 16th it took over a sector near Thiaucourt extending from northeast to Jaulny on the east to the southern end of Etany de Lachaussee on the west. It held this sector until the signing of the armistice and then went to the divisional training area.

To include May 15, 1919, the division's casualties were 2,531 battle deaths, and 13,746 wounded. Seven hundred and twenty-six individuals of this division were taken prisoners by the enemy.

Distinguished Service Crosses awarded, 58.

Commanding generals: Maj. Gen. C. M. Clement to Dec. 11, 1917; Maj. Gen. Chas. H. Muir, Dec. 15, 1917, to Oct. 24, 1918; Maj. Gen. Wm. H. Hay, Oct. 24 to Nov. 11, 1918.

The units composing the division were as follows: 55th and 56th Inf. Brigs., 109th, 110th, 11th, 112th Inf. Regts.; 108th and 109th Machine Gun Bns.; 53d Arty. Brig.; 107th and 108th and 109th Arty. Regts.; 103d Trench Mortar Battery; 107th Div. Machine Gun Bn.; 103d Engr. Regt. And Train; 103d Fld. Sig. Bn.; 103d Train Hqs. and M.P.; 103d Supply Train; 103d Amm. Train; 103d Sanitary Train; 109th, 110th, 11th, 112th Amb. Cos. And Field Hospitals.


Twenty-ninth Division (National Guard)

29th Division PatchKnown as the "Blue and Gray Division." Insignia, the Korean symbol of good luck, a circle bisected by two half circles, reversed and joined; one-half of the circle is blue, and the other gray. Composed of National Guards of New Jersey, Delaware, Maryland, District of Columbia, and Virginia.

Mobilized and trained at Camp McClellan under Major-General Wm. S. Haan, headquarters arrived overseas June 27, 1918. Activities of the division included the center sector of Haute Alsace and the Grand Montagne sector, north of Verdun. The division captured 2,187 officers and men, 21 pieces of artillery and 250 machine guns. After the armistice the division was stationed for some time at Bourbonne les Bain. It returned home and was demobilized in June, 1919.

The division made a total advance against resistance of seven kilometers and captured 2,187 officers and men, 21 pieces of artillery and 250 machine guns. Battle deaths, 940, wounded, 5,219; prisoners of war, 67. Four thousand nine hundred and seventy-seven replacements were required by this division. Distinguished Service Crosses awarded, 150.

Maj.Gen. Charles G. Morton commanded the division.

The following units composed the division: 29th Div. Hqs. Troop and Detachment, 57th Inf. Big. (113th and 114th Inf. Regts and 111th M.G. Bn.), the 58th Inf. Brig. (115th and 116th Inf. Regts. And 112th M.G. Bn.) The 54th Arty. Brig. (110th, 111th and 112th Regts of Arty., 104th T. M. Battery, 104th Amm. Train) the 110th Machine Gun Bn., the 104th Fld Sig. Bn., the 104th Engr. Regt. And Train, the 10th Train Hqs and M.P., the 104th Supply Train, the 104th Sanitary Train (113th, 114th, 115th and 116th Amb. Cos. And Field Hospitals).


Thirtieth Division (National Guard)

30th Division PatchInsignia, a monogram in blue of the letters "O" and "H", standing for "Old Hickory," the nickname of Andrew Jackson. The cross bar of the "H" contains the triple "XXX," the Roman numerals for thirty. The whole is on a maroon background. Organized at Camp Sevier, S.C., in October, 1917. This division was formerly the old 9th National Guard Division (1st, 2d and 3d Tenn. Inf.; 1st Tenn. F.A.; Tp.D, Tenn. Cav.; 1st Tenn. Field Hospital; 1st, 2nd and 3d N.C. Inf.; 1st N.C.F.A.; 1st Sq. N.C. Cav.; 1st N.C. Engrs; Co. A, N.C. Sig. Corps; N.C. Supply Train; 1st N.C. Field Hospital; 1st N.C. Amb. Co.; 1st and 2d S.C. Inf.; Co. A, S.C. Sig. Corps; 1st S.C. Field Hospital; Troop A, S.C. Cav.). In addition to the above the division was augmented by draft men from North and South Carolina, Tennessee, Indiana, Illinois, Iowa, Minnesota, and North Dakota.

First units sailed for overseas on May 7, 1918, and the last units landed at Calais, France, on June 24, 1918. The division was ordered to the Eperlecques training area (Pas-de-Calais) and remained there until July 4th, when it was ordered into Belgium under command of the 2d British Corps and placed in support of the 33d and 49th British divisions. Division headquarters was located at Watou and it was here that this division received its first training in the line. On Aug. 17th the division took over the Canal sector extending from the southern outskirts of Ypres to Voormezelle and from Aug. 31st to Sept. 1st engaged in the battle before Mt. Kemmel. The division was then withdrawn and placed in reserve until Sept. 17th, when it was again sent into the line with division headquarters at Herissart. On Sept. 22d the division was placed under command of the 4th British Army and took over the Beaurevoir sector the following day. Participated in the battle of Bellincourt Sept. 29th- 30th, which resulted in the breaking of the Hindenburg line. On Oct. 4th the division took over the line near Montbrehain where it attacked on four successive days making an advance of over 17,000 yards. On Oct. 17th participated in the Battle of La Selle river, and remained in the attack until Oct. 20th. The division was withdrawn to the Heilly training area immediately after the battle, where it was located at the signing of the armistice. On Nov. 24th the division was ordered to the Le Mans area preparatory to returning to the United States. The Divisional Artillery was not present for operations with the division, but was in active operations in the Toul sector, St. Mihiel offensive, Meuse-Argonne offensive and the Woevre sector.

This division captured from the enemy the following; 3,848 prisoners, 81 pieces of artillery and 426 machine guns. It made a total advance of twenty-nine and a half kilometers against resistence. Battle deaths, 1,652; wounded 9,429; number taken prisoners, 6 officers and 71 men. Distinguished Service Crosses awarded, 177.

Commanding generals: Maj.Gen. John F. Morrison, from organization to Nov. 20, 1917; Maj. Gen. C. P. Townsley, Nov. 20 to Dec. 17, 1917; Maj. Gen. Geo. W. Read, April 27 to Aug. 10, 1918; Maj. Gen. Edw. M. Lewis, Aug. 10 to Nov. 11, 1918.

The units composing the division were as follows: 59th, 60th Inf. Brigs., 117th, 118th, 119th, 120th Inf. Regts., 114th, 115th Machine Gun Bns., 55th Arty. Brig., 113th, 114th, 115th, Arty. Regts., 105th Trench Mortar Battery, 113th Div. Machine Gun Bn., 105th Engr. Regt. And Train, 105th Fld. Sig. Bn., 105th Train Hqs. And M.P., 105th Supply Train, 105th Amm. Train, 105th Sanitary Train (117th, 118th, 119th, 120th Amb. Cos. And Field Hospitals).


Thirty-First Division (National Guard)

Insignia, the letters "DD" back to back, in red, on a khaki shield. Organized at Camp Wheeler, Ga., on Oct. 1st, 1917. The nucleus of this division was composed of National Guard Troops from Georgia, Alabama and Florida (1st and 2d Regts., Ala. Inf.; 1st Reg. Ala Cav.; Co. A, Ala. Fld. Sig. Bn.; Field Hospital Co. No. 1; 1st, 2d, and 5th Ga. Inf.; 1st Sq. Ga. Cav.; 1st Bn. Ga. Fld. Arty.; Co. A, Ga. Engrs.; Ga. Field Hospital No. 1). The division was brought up to full strength by National Army drafts from Illinois and Michigan. The 31st Division remained in training at Camp Wheeler until Sept., 1918.

The first units sailed for overseas on Sept. 16, 1918, and the last units arrived in France on Nov. 9, 1918. Upon arrival in France the division was designated as a replacement division and ordered to the Le Mans area. The personnel of most of the units were withdrawn from the division and sent to other divisions as replacements, causing the 31st to exist only as a skeltonized division.

Commanding generals: Maj. Gen. Francis J. Kernan, Aug. 25th, 1917 to Sept. 18, 1917; Maj. Gen. John L. Hayden, Sept. 18, 1917 to March 15, 1918; Maj. Gen. Francis H. French, March 15, 1918 to May 15, 1918; Maj. Gen. LeRoy S. Lyon, May 15, 1918 to Nov. 11, 1918.

The units composing the division were: 61st, 62nd Inf. Brigs., 56th Fld. Arty Brig., 121st, 122nd, 123rd, 124th Inf. Regts. 116th, 117th, 118th Machine Gun Bns., 116th, 117th, 118th Fld. Arty. Regts., 106th Trench Mortar Battery, 106th Engr. Regt. And Train, 106th Fld. Sig. Bn., 106th Hqs. Train and M.P., 106th Amm. Train, 106th Supply Train, 106th Sanitary Train (121st, 122nd, 123rd, and 124th Field Hospitals and Amb. Cos.)


Thirty-second Division (National Guard)

Insignia, a flying red arrow with a red cross bar in the middle. Organized at Camp MacArthur, Waco, Texas, in Sept., 1917. This division was formerly the old 12th National Guard Division, composed of troops from Wisconsin and Michigan, (1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 5th and 6th Regts. Wis. Inf., 21st , 32nd, and 33rd Mich. Inf., 1st Wis. F.A., and 1st Mich. F.A., 1st Wis. Cav. And 1st Mich. Cav., 1st Bn. Wis. Engrs and 1st Bn. Mich. Engrs., 1st Wis. Fld. Sig. Bn., and 1st Mich. Fld. Sig. Bn., Wis. And Mich. Field Hospital and Amb. Cos. Nos.1 and 2.)

First units of the division embarked for overseas at Hoboken on January 19, 1918, and the last units arrived in France, March 12, 1918. The division was ordered to the 10th training area with hdqs. at Prauthoy, Haute-Marne and was designated as a replacement division. On May 15, 1918, the status of the division was changed to a combat division and moved into Alsace where it took over a front-line sector near Belfort. The division held this sector until July 21st when it was relieved by the French and ordered to the Ourcq where it relieved the 3d Division in the Aisne-Marne offensive on July 30th. In this offensive the 32nd Division broke the German line of resistance on the Ourcq and drove the enemy back to the heights of the Vesle making a total advance of nineteen kilometers. On Aug. 28th it entered the front line northeast of Soissons as a part of the French 10th Army and contributed to an important extent to the success of the French in outflanking the German line on the Chemin-des-Dames. In this drive the 32nd Division captured the strong German position on the Juvigny plateau, advancing to a depth of five and a half kilometers. On Sept. 2d, the division was relieved by the 2d Moroccan Division and sent back to Joinville for a rest period. On Sept. 20th the division left the Joinville rest area and moved by bus to the Meuse-Argonne front. On Sept. 30th the division entered the front line before the Kriemhilde Stellung near Romagne-sous-Montfaucon. In a series of attacks during the next three weeks the division penetrated the enemy positio during the next three weeks the division penetrated the enemy position to a depth of eight and a half kilometers. On October 20th the division was relieved and placed in the 3d Army Corps reserve until Nov. 6th when it again entered the line at the Dun-sur-Meuse bridgehead and on Nov. 10th attacked east of the Meuse, and was in line when the armistice was signed.

The division became part of the 3rd Army upon its organization and on Nov. 17th began its march from Vilosnes-sur-Meuse to the Rhine and on Dec. 13th after marching 300 kilometers crossed the Rhine and occupied a sector in the Coblenz bridgehead with the 1st Division on the right and the 2d Division on the left.

This division captured from the enemy the following: 2,153 prisoners, 21 pieces of artillery and 190 machine guns. It made a total advance of thirty-six kilometers against resistance. Battle deaths, 2,898; wounded 10,986; number taken prisoners, one office and 155 men. Distinguished Serivce Crosses awarded, 134.

The 32nd Division was composed of the following organizations: 63rd and 64th Inf. Brigs., 125th, 126th, 127th, 128th Inf. Regts., 119th, 120th, 121st Machine Gun Bns., 57th F.A. Brig., 119th, 120th, 121st Fld. Arty. Regts., 107th Trench Mortar Batteries, 107th Engr. Regt. and Train, 107th Fld. Sig. Bn., 107th Hdqs. Train and M.P., 107th Amm. Train, 107th Supply Train, 107th Sanitary Train (125th, 126th, 127th and 128th Amb. Cos. And Field Hospitals).


Thirty-Third Division (National Guard)

Popularly known as the "Prarie Division." Insignia, a yellow cross on a round black patch. Organized at Camp Logan, Houston, Texas, about the middle of August, 1917. The nucleus of the division was the Illinois National Guard (1st and 2nd Inf. Brig. Hdqs.; 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 5th, 6th and 7th Inf. Regts.; 2nd and 3rd Regts. Fld. Arty.; Co. A, Signal Corps; 1st Engrs; 1st, 2d, 3d, 4th Field Hospitals and Amb. Cos.). The first organization left Camp Logan, April 23, 1918, for Camp Merritt. The rest of the division followed shortly afterward and sailed from Hoboken for France, disembarking at Brest. The last units arrived in France June 11, 1918.

Upon arrival in France the division was first sent to the Huppy area, near Abbeville, and on June 20th and 21st the division moved into the Amiens sector, where it was trained under the British, occupying portions of the British trenches and participating in a number of small operations. On July 4th, Cos. C and E, 131st Inf., and A and G, 132nd Inf. Took part in the attack on Hamel, which was the first time American troops had fought with the Austrailians. On August 8, 1918, began the great British offensive, in which the 33d Division broke the German line at Chipilly Ridge and Gressaire Wood. On Aug. 23d it was transferred by rail from the British front to the area of the 1st American Army in the Toul sector, being concentrated on Aug. 26th in the region of Tronville-en-Barrois. On Sept. 5th it started for Verdun, where it relieved on the nights of Sept. 7th, 8th, and 9th, the 120th French Division.

In the Meuse-Argonne battle, commencing Sept. 26th, the 33rd Division formed the right of the 3d Armerican Army Corps. For the next eleven days it formed the pivot of this corps. On Oct. 6th, the division was transferred to the French 17th Army Corps and participated (Oct. 8th) in the attack of the French 17th Corps east of the Meuse. Upon being relieved the 33d Division marched to the Troyon-sur-Meuse sector on the St. Mihiel front, relieving the 79th Division on the nights of Oct. 23d, 24th, and 25th. From this date to include the date of the armistice the division participated in a number of minor operations in this sector.

This division captured from the enemy the following: 65 officers; 3,922 men, 100 pieces of artillery, 414 machine guns, 20 trench mortars and other material. It made a total advance against resistance of thirty-six kilometers. Battle deaths, 153 officers and 701 men; wounded, 153 officers and 6,844 men; missing 148 men; prisoners of war, one officer and 17 men.

Maj. Gen. George Bell, Jr., U.S. Army commanded the division from Aug. 16, 1917 to include Nov. 11, 1918.

Following is a list of the decorations conferred on individuals of this division: Congressional Medals of Honor, 8; Distinguished Service Crosses, 110; British Distinguished Service Orders, 1; British Military Medals, 41; French Croix de Guerre, 47; Belgian Order of Leopold, 1.

The following organizations composed this division: 65th and 66th Inf. Brigs., 129th, 130th, 131st, and 132d Inf. Regts., 123d and 124th Machine Gun Bns., 58th Arty. Brig., 122d, 123d, and 124th Arty. Regts., 108th Trench Mortar Battery, 122d Div. Machine Gun Bn., 108th Supply Train, 108th Amm. Train, 108th Sanitary Train (129th, 130th, 131st and 132d Amb. Cos. And Field Hospitals).


Thirty-Fourth Division (National Guard)

Known as the "Sandstorm Division." Insignia, a black oval encircling a red bovine skull. Organized at Camp Cody, New Mexico, on Oct. 2, 1917. The division was made up of National Guard troops from Minnesota, Iowa, Nebraska, North Dakota and South Dakota. (Hqs. 1st Minn. Brig.; 1st, 2nd, and 3rd Minn. Inf.; Minn. Field Hospital and Amb. Cos. No. 1; Hqs. 1st Iowa Brig.; 1st and 2nd Iowa Inf.; 1st Sq. Iowa Cav.; 1st Iowa F.A.; 1st Bn. Iowa Engrs; Co. C, Iowa Sig. Corps.; Iowa Amm. Train; Iowa Field Hospitals and Ambulance Cos. No.s 1 and 2; 4th, 5th and 6th Nebraska Inf.; Co. B, Nebraska Sig. Corps.; 1st Regt. North Dakota Inf., and North Dakota Field Hospital Co. No. 1; 1st Regt. South Dakota Cav.). The 34th Division remained in training at Camp Cody, New Mexico, until, Sept., 1918. The first units sailed for overseas on Sept. 16, 1918, via England, and the last units arrived in France on Oct. 24, 1918. Upon arrival in France, the division was ordered to the Le Mans area where it was broken up. In the early part of December, the division began its return to the United States by individual units.

Commanding Generals: Maj. Gen. A. P. Blocksom, Sept. 18, 1917, to May 7, 1918; Maj. Gen. Wm. R. Smith, Sept. 28 to Oct. 10, 1918; Maj. Gen. Beaumont B. Buck, Oct. 17 to Nov. 7, 1918; Brig. Gen. John A. Johnson, Nov. 7 to Nov. 11, 1918.

This division was composed of the following organizations: 67th, 68th Inf. Brigs., 69th Fld. Arty. Brig., 133d, 134th, 135th, and 136th Inf. Regts., 125th, 126th, 127th Fld. Arty. Regts., 109th Trench Mortar Battery, 109th Fld. Sig. Bn., 109th Hqs. Train and M.P., 109th Amm. Train, 109th Supply Trian, 109th Sanitary Train (133d, 134th, 135th, and 136th Amb. Cos. and Field Hospitals), 109th Field Train, 109th Engr. Regt. And Train.


Thirty-Fifth Division (National Guard)

Insignia the Santa Fe Cross. Organized at Camp Doniphan, Fort Sill, Oklahoma, Sept. 13, 1917, from the National Guard units of Missouri and Kansas. On April 11, 1198, it began leaving camp for Camp Mills, N.Y., and sailed for France April 25th, via Liverpool and Winchester, England, arriving in France, May 11th. It trained with the British first in the area of Eu until June 11th, from then until June 30th in the Arches area. From the training sector, it went into the trenches in the Vosges in the DeGalbert and Gerardmer sectors. On Sept. 11th, it was sent to the St. Mihiel sector, where it acted as army reserve during the operations. On Sept. 21st, the division relieved a French division in the Grange le Compte sector. It next went into the Meuse-Argonne offensive Sept. 26th in the Vauquois sector until Oct. 1st, when it was withdrawn and sent to the vicinity of Conde-en-Barrois, where it arrived Oct. 12th, taking over the Sommedieue sector. From there it was sent on Nov. 9th to the training area near Commercy.

The division captured from the enemy the following: 781 prisoners, 24 pieces of artillery, 85 machine guns, and other material. It advanced twelve and one-half kilometers in the face of resistance. Battle deaths: 960, wounded, 6,894 captured, 169. Distinguished Service Crosses awarded, 17.

Commanding generals: Maj.-Gen. W. M. Wright, Brig.-Gen. N. F. McClure, Maj. Gen. Peter M. Traub.

The following organizations composed this division: 69th, 70th Inf. Brig., 137th, 138th, 139th, 140th, Inf. Regts., 129th, 130th Machine Gun Bns., 60th Arty. Brig., 128th, 129th, 130th Arty. Regts., 110th Trench Mortar Battery, 128th Div. Machine Gun Bn., 110th Engr. Regt. and Train, 110th, Fld. Sig. Bn., 110th Train Hq. and M.P., 110th Supply Train, 110th Amm. Train, 110th Sanitary Train (137th, 138th, 139th, 140th Amb. Cos. And Field Hospitals).


Thirty-Sixth Division (National Guard)

Insignia, a light blue Indian arrow head on a round khaki patch with a khaki "T" superimposed. The division is sometimes popularly known as the "Lone Star" or "Panther Division." Organized at Camp Bowie, Texas, from Aug. 25th to Oct. 15, 1917. The officers and men were drawn largely from the states of Texas and Oklahoma. On July 4th the division left for Camp Mills, L.I. Sailed from Hoboken, N.J., on July 18th, units arriving at Brest, St. Nazaire, Le Havre and Bordeaux, beginning July 30th, thence proceeding to the 13th training area in vicinity of Bar-sur-Aube. On Sept. 27th the division left for the Champagne section, detraining at Epernay and vicinity.

Commencing Oct. 6th, the division took an active part in the operations of the 4th French Army, advancing a distance of twenty-one kilometers to the Aisne river where it was relieved on the night of Oct. 27th to 28th and withdrawn to the Thiaucourt rest area. On Nov. 18th the troops departed, by marching, for the 16th training area surrounding Tonnerre, arriving in billets in the Tonnerre area Nov. 28th.

This division captured from the enemy, 18 officers, 531 men, 9 pieces of artillery, 295 machine guns. It made a total advance against resistance of about twenty-one kilometers. Distinguished Service Cross awards, 24. Battle deaths, 591; wounded, 2,119, prisoners of war, 25.

Maj. Gen. E. St. John Greble, U.S.A., organized and commanded the division for some time. Maj. Gen. W. R. Smith, U.S.A., was in command during the latter part of the war.

The units composing the division were as follows: 71st and 72d Inf., Brigs, 141st, 142d, 143d and 144th Inf. Regts., 132d and 133 Machine Gun Bns., 61st Arty. Brig., 131st, 132d and 133d Arty. Regts., 111th. Trench Mortar Battery, 111th Amm. Train, 131st Div. Machine Gun Bn., 111th Fld. Sig. Bn., 111th Engr. Regt. and Train, 111th Supply Train (141st, 142nd, 143rd and 144th Amb. Cos. And Field Hospitals).

To form this division the following National Guard units were drawn from the states: Oklahoma: 1st Inf., Sq. Cav.; 1st Engrs. Bn.; F. H. Co. No. 1. Texas: 1st and 2nd Inf. Brigs., Div. Hq. Troop; 3d, 4th, 1st, 5th, 6th, 7th Inf.,; 1st Cav.; 1st and 2d F.A. Regts.; 1st Engrs Bn.; Bn. S.C.; Hq. Trains and M.P.; Amb. Cos. And Fields Hospitals Nos. 1 and 2.


Thirty-Seventh Division (National Guard)

Popularly known as the "Buckeye Division." Insignia, a red circle with a white border. Composed of National Guard of "Buckeye" State, Ohio. Organized at Camp Sheridan, Montgomery, Alabama, beginning in August, 1917, when the first units of the Ohio National Guard arrived, and completed in October when the last had reached camp. The division was built around the 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 5th, 6th, 7th, 8th, and 10th Ohio Inf. Regts., 1st Ohio Fld. Arty., 1st Ohio Cav., 1st Ohio Engrs., and the Ohio Fld. Sig. Bn. On May 20th the division, less its artillery, was sent to Camp Lee, Virginia, where it was filled to war strength and on June 11th, Hqs and Hqs Troop, 134th Machine Bn. And 73d Inf. Brig. Began the movement to Hoboken, sailing on June 15th and arriving in France June 22, 1918. The 74th Inf. Brig. And Engrs left Camp Lee June 21st and sailing via Newport News arrived in France July 5th. The F.A. Brig., Trench Mortar Battery, Sanitary Train, M.P., and 114th Vet Section, left Camp Sheridan, Ala, June 14th for Camp Upton, sailing from there June 27th via England.

With the exception of the F.A. Brig. And Amm. Train (less small arms section) the division was sent to the Bourmont area for training, and on Aug. 4th went into the front line in the Baccarat sector in the Vosges mountains where it trained under the 6th French Corps. On Sept. 16th it proceeded by rail to the vicinity of Robert-Espagne. After four days it was moved by bus to Recicourt and as a part of the 5th Corps entered the Argonne drive at Avocourt. Relieved on Oct. 1st after having advanced to Cierges, the division was sent to Pagny-sur-Meuse from which point it was sent to hold a portion of the line in the St. Mihiel sector with headquarters at Euvesin. After nine days in this sector the division was withdrawn to Pagny-sur-Meuse and on Oct. 18th began its move by rail to Belgium where the Div. Hqs. At Hooglede in the Lys sector it was attached to the French Army 30th Corps on Oct. 22d. Advancing to and crossing the Escaut river the division was relieved from the front lines on November 4th and 5th and returned to Thielt for rest. On Nov. 8th the division was transferred to the 34th French Corps and again entered the lines along the Escaut river in a sector with Syngem as its headquarters. Forcing a crossing of the Scheldt (Escaut) river on the night of Nov. 10th-11th, the advance was begun early on the 11th and pushed forward some five kilometers to the towns of Dickele and Hindelgem where the arimistice at 11 a.m. brought the fighting to an end.

The artillery was sent to Camp de Souge for training and assigned to the 1st Army in the Argonne offensive, never serving with its own division. It served successively with the 4th American Corps, 2nd American Army, 2nd French Colonial Army, and 17th French Corps. At one time the three regiments of the brigade served with three different divisions, the 28th, 33d, and 92d, and only joined the division just prior to its return to the United States.

Maj. Gen. Charles G. Treat was the first commander of the division, being relieved April 24th. On May 8th, Maj. Gen. Chas. S. Farnsworth commanded until its return to the States.

The division made the following captures from the enemy: Officers, 26 enlisted men, 1,474; artillery nineteen 77's; four 105's; ten 155's; seven trench mortars; machine guns, 261, besides many rifles and a great deal of ammunition of all calibers. This division made a total advance against resistance of thirty and three-fourths kilometers. Battle deaths, 992; wounded 4,931; prisoners of war 23. One thousand two hundred and fifty replacements were furnished the 37th Division. Distinguished Service Crosses awarded, 25.

The following units composed this division: 73d and 74th Inf. Brigs.; 145th, 146th, 147th and 148th Inf. Regts; 135th and 136th Machine Gun Bns.; 62d Arty. Brig. 134th, 135th and 136th Arty. Regts.; 112th Trench Mortar Battery; 134th Div. Machine Gun Bn.; 112th Engr. Regt. And Train; 112th Fld. Sig. Bn.; 112th Amm. Train; 112th Sanitary Train (145th, 146th, 147th and 148th Amb. Cos. And Field Hospitals).


Thirty-Eighth Division (National Guard)

38th Division PatchInsignia, a shield, the right half of which is red and the left half blue. The "C" and "Y" in white are superimposed on the shield, standing for "Cyclone Division." Organized at Camp Shelby, Miss., Aug. 25, 1917. This division was made up of National Guard units from Kentucky, West Virginia and Indiana. (1st Ind. Inf., Brig., Hqs., 1st, 2nd, 3rd and 4th Inf. Inf.; 1st Sq. Ind. Cav.; 1st Bn. Ind. Engrs.; 1st Bn. Ind. Sig. Corps.; Ind. Amb. Cos. Nos. 1, 2, and 3, and Ind. Field Hosp. Cos. No. 1 and 2; 1st , 2nd, and 3rd Ky. Inf.; Co. B, Ky Sig. Corps; Ky. Amb Co. No. 1 and Ky Field Hospital Cos. Nos. 1 and 2; 1st and 2nd Regts. W.Va. Inf.). Upon arrival in France in the middle of October, 1918, the division was ordered to the LeMans area, when it was broken up. Returned to the United States in December, 1918.

Commanding generals: Maj.Gen. Wm. H. Sage, Brig. Gen. Edward M. Lewis, Brig. Gen. Henry H. Whitney, Brig-Gen. Wm. V. Judson.

The following organization composed the 38th Division: 75th and 76th Inf. Brigs., 63d Fld. Arty. Brig., 149th, 150th, 151st and 152d Inf. Regts., 137th, 138th and 139th Machine Gun Bns., 137th, 138th, and 139th Fld. Arty. Regts., 113th Trench Mortar Battery, 113th Engr. Regt. And Train, 113th Fld. Sig. Bn., 113th Hqs. Train and M.P., 113th Amm. Train, 113th Supply Train, 113th Sanitary Train (149th, 150th, 151st and 152d Amb. Cos. And Field Hospitals).


Thirty-Ninth Division (National Guard)

Insignia, a bull's eye; inner circle, red; middle, white; outer, black. Organized at Camp Beauregard, La., in Sept., 1917. This division was composed of National Guard troops from Louisiana, Mssissippi. and Arkansas (1st, 2d and 3d Regts. Ark.Inf.; Ark. Amm. Train; Ark. Field Hospital and Amb. Co. No.1, 1st La. Inf.; 2nd Separate Troop, La. Cav.; 1st Regt. La. F. A., and La. Field Hospital Co. No. 1; 1st and 2d Regts. Miss. Inf.; 1st and 2d Separate Sqs. Miss. Inf.; 1st and 2nd Separate Sqs. Miss. Cav.; 1st Regt. Miss. F. A.; Co. A, Miss. Engrs., and Miss. Field Hospital Co. No.1). The last units arrived in France on Sept. 7, 1918. Ordered to the St. Florent area (Sur Cher) and designated as the 5th Depot Division. Remained in this area, traming the personnel to be used as replacements until about November 1st. The training cadres were then transferred to the 1st Depot Division at St. Aignan. On Nov. 30th the division in its skeletonized form was ordered to St. Nazaire for embarkation to the United States. Debarked at Newport News, Va., on Jan. 1, 1919, and went into camp at Camp Stuart, Va. On Jan. 9th, proceeded to Camp Beauregard, La., and on Jan. 18th demobilization was commenced.

Maj.-Gen. Henry C. Hodges was the commanding general of this division.

This division was composed of the following organizations: 77th and 78th Inf. Brigs., 64th Fld. Arty. Brig., 153d, 154th, 155th, and 156th Inf. Regts., 140th, 141st, and 142nd Machine Gun Bns., 140th, 141st, and 142d Ftd. Arty. Regis., 114th Trench Mortar Battery, 114th Engr. Regts. And Train, 114th Fld. Sig. Bn., 114th Hqs. Trains and M.P. 114th Amm. Train, 114th Supply Train, 114th Sanitary Train, 114th Sanitary Train (153rd, 154th, 155th and 156th Amb. Cos. and Field Hospitals).


Fortieth Division (National Guard)

40th Division PatchPopularly known as the "Sunshine Division." Insignia, a golden sun superimposed on a blue circle. Organized at Camp Kearny, California in September, 1917. The division was made up from the National Guard troops from California, Nevada, Utah, Colorado, Arizona and New Mexico. (1st Ariz. Inf.; 2nd, 5th, and 7th Calif. Inf.; 1st Calif. M. G. Troop, 1st Separate Squadron Calif. Cav.; 1st and 2nd Calif. Fld. Arty.; Co. B, Calif. Sig. Corps.; Calif. Field Hospital and Amb. Cos. Nos. 1 and 2; 1st and 2nd Colo. Inf.; 1st Colo. Cav.; 1st Bn. Colo. Engrs.; Co. B, Colo. Sig. Corps and 1st Colo. Engr. Train; 1st New Mexico Inf.; 1st New Mex. Fld. Arty. And New Mex. Field Hospital Co. No. 1.) First units embarked fro overseas on Aug. 7th and the last units arrived in France on Aug. 28th. [1918]. Upon arrival in France the divsion was made a replacement division and was ordered to La Guerche (Cher) and became the 6th Depot Division. The division was then broken up and its personnel was used as replacements for combat divisions at the front.

Maj. Gen. Frederick S. Strong commanded the division from the time of its organization.

The division was composed of the following organizations: 79th and 80th Brigs., 65th Fld. Arty. Brig., 157th, 158th, 159th, 160th Inf. Regts., 143d, 144th, 145th Machine Gun Bns.,143d, 144th, 145th Fld. Arty. Regts, 115th Trench Mortar Battery, 115th Engr. Regt. And Train; 115th Fld. Sig. Bn., 115th Hqs. Train and M.P., 115th Amm. Train, 115th Sanitary Train (157th, 158th, 159th, 160th Amb. Cos. and Field Hospitals).


Forty-first Division (National Guard)

Known as the "Sunset Division." Insignia, a setting sun in gold on red background, over blue stripe. Organized at Camp Greene, N.C., September, 1917. The division was composed of National Guard troops from Washington, Oregon, Montana, Idaho, and Wyoming. (2d Ida. Inf.; F.H. Co. No. 1; 2nd Mont. Inf.; 3d Ore. Inf.; Sep. Squadron Ore. Cav.; Sep. Bn. Ore. Engrs.; Batteries A and B, Ore. Fld Arty.; 2d Wash. Inf.; 1st Squadron Wash. Cav.; M. G. Troop, Wash. Cav.; 1st Bn. Wash. Fld. Arty.; 1st Bn. Wash. Sign Corps; Wash. F. H. Co. No. 1; 3d Wyo. Inf.) The division remained in training at Camp Greene until October, 1917. On October 18, 1917, the first units embarked for overseas and the last units arrived in France on December 7, 1917.

Upon arrival in France the division was designated as the 1st Depot Division and ordered to the St. Aignan training area. The division was then broken up and formed into training cadres for the instruction of replacements for combat divisions at the front. The 66th Artillery Brigade was left intact and after a period of training was attached to the 1st Corps on July 1, 1918, as Corps Artillery. This brigade served as Corps and Army Artillery throughout its service in France and was engaged in active operations in the Marne-Aisne, St. Mihiel and Meuse-Argonne offensive.

The 41st Division while serving as the 1st Depot Division from Jan. 1, 1918, to Dec. 31, 1918, forwarded from its area 263,395 replacements and casuals.

Commanding generals: Maj. Gen. Hunter Liggett, Aug. 16, 1917, to Jan. 17, 1918 (on D.S.); Brig. Gen. Henry Jervey, Sept. 19 to Dec. 6, 1917; Brig. Gen. Geo. LeR. Irwin, Dec. 6, 1917, to Jan. 9, 1918; Brig. Gen. Richard Coulter Jan. 23 to Feb. 14, 1918; Brig. Gen. Robert Alexander, Feb. 14 to Aug. 10, 1918; Brig. Gen. Wm. S. Scott, Aug. 10 to Oct. 24, 1918; Maj. Gen. John E. McMahon, Oct. 24 to Nov. 7, 1918; Brig. Gen. Eli Cole, Nov. 7 to Nov. 11, 1918.

The following organizations composed the division: 81st and 82nd Inf. Brigs., 66th Fld Arty. Brig., 161st, 162nd, 163d, and 164th Inf. Regts., 146th, 147th, 148th Machine Gun Bns., 146th, 147th and 148th Fld. Arty. Regts., 116th Trench Mortar Battery, 116th Engr. Regt. And Train, 116th Fld. Sig. Bn., 116th Hqs. Train and M.P. 116th Amm. Train, 116th Supply Train, 116th Sanitary Train (161st, 162nd, 163rd, and 164th Field Hospitals and Amb. Cos.)


Forty-Second Division (National Guard)

Known as the "Rainbow Division." Insignia, a rainbow on black field. Organized August 5, 1917. It was completely assembled at Camp Mills by September 13th. Composed of National Guard Units, coming from every section of the United States. The following states were represented: New York (69th Inf.), Iowa (3d Inf.), Wisconsin (Cos. E., F and G, 2nd Inf.) Indiana (1st. F.A.), Maryland (3rd and 4th Cos. C.A.C.), Kansas (1st Amm. Tr.), Oklahoma (Amb. Co. No. 1), District of Columbia (F. H. Co. No. 1), Ohio (4th Inf.), California (1st Bn. Engrs.), New Jersey (Amb.Co. No. 1), Michigan (1st Amb. Co.), Nebraska (F. H. Co. No. 1), Colorado (F. H. Co. No. 1), Oregon (F. H. Co. No. 1), Alabama (4th Inf.), Georgia (Cos. B, C, and F, 2nd Inf.), Louisiana (1st Sep. Troop Cav.), South Carolina (1st Bn. Engrs.), North Carolina (Eng. Train), Texas (Supply Train), Virginia (1st and 2nd Cos. C.A.C.), Tennessee (Amb. Co. No. 1), Missouri (1st Bn. Sig. Corps).

On October 18, 1917, the division embarked for France. Division headquarters landed at St. Nazaire, November 1st. Debarkation complete December 7th. Debarked at St. Nazaire, Brest and Liverpool. Troops were assembled in the Vaucoulers training area. Division marched to La Fauche area beginning December 12th, thence to Rolampont area where it remained until February, 1918. Moved to vicinity of Luneville where they trained serving in the line with corresponding French units. The division area, but orders were revoked and it was relived the 128th French Division in the Baccarat sector. It was relieved on June 21st and moved by rail to Camp de Chalons, and while preparing to go into more extensive training, news of impending German attack caused the division to be thrown into second position, also portions of the intermediate and outposts, under the 21st French Army Corps.

On July 15, 1918, the German attack against this corps was broken and the division was withdrawn by July 18th, moved by train and camion, and on July 25th it took over the front of the 1st United States Army Corps for a distance of fifteen kilometers. Relieved August 3d, and moved by rail and marching to Bourmont area where it went into intensive training, moving to the St. Mihiel salient August 30th, where it delivered the attack from the south, being the center division, of the 4th Corps, and advancing nineteen kilometers during two days' attack, September 12th and 13th. On October 1st, the division was relieved, moving to the Bois de Montfaucon on Octber 6th as reserve of the Fifth Army Corps. It relieved one of the line divisions north of Fleville-Exermont on October 13th in the Argonne, and attacking, advancing two kilometers. Division was relieved October 31st. The division again advanced to support the attack of November 1st, relieving a line division and advanced nineteen kilometers in two days to the Meuse river and the heights south of Sedan. On November 10th, the division withdrew and moved to Brandeville region, becoming a part of the Army of Occupation. On December 15th it moved to the Kreis of Ahrweiler, division headquarters being established at Ahrweiler, Germany.

Battle deaths 2,713; wounded 13,292; prisoners captured by enemy, 102. Distinguished Service Crosses awarded, 205.

The battles engaged in by the 42nd Division entitling organizations to silver bands on their regimental color stffs were: (1) Luneville sector, Lorraine, February 21 to March 23, 1918; (2) Baccarat sector, Lorraine, March 31 to June 21, 1918; (3) Esperance-Souain sector, Champagne, July 4 to July 17, 1918; (4) Champagne-Marne defensive, July 15 to 17, 1918; (5) Aisne-Marne offensive, July 25 to August 3, 1918; (6) Aisne-Marne offensive July 25 to August 11, 1918; (7) St. Mihiel offensive, September 12 to 16, 1918; (8) Essey and Pannes sector, Woevre, September 17 to 30, 1918; (9) Meuse-Argonne offensive, October 12 to 31, 1918; (10) Meuse-Argonne, October 7 to November 1, 1918; (11) Meuse-Argonne offensive, November 5 to 10, 1918; (12) Meuse-Argonne offensive November 5 to 9, 1918.

The commanding generals: Major General William A. Mann, September, 1917 to December 14, 1917; Major General Charles T. Menoher, December 14, 1917 to November 7, 1918; Major General Charles D. Rhodes, November 7, 1918 to November 11, 1918.

The units comprising the division were as follows: 83d and 84th Inf. Brigs., 165th, 166th, 167th, 168th Inf. Regts., 150th, 151st Machine Gun Bns., 67th Art. Brig., 149th, 150th, 151st Art. Regts., 117th Regt. Trench Mortar Battery, 149th Div. Machine Gun Bn., 117th Eng. Regt., and Train, 117th Field Sig. Bn., 117th Train Hq. And M.P., 117th Supply Train, 117th Amm. Train, 117th Sanitary Train, (165th, 166th, 167th, 168th Amb. Cos. And Field Hospitals).


Seventy-Sixth Division (National Army)

Known as the "Liberty Bell Division." Insignia is a blue liberty bell superimposed on a khaki square. Organized at Camp Devens, Mass., in Sept., .1917. The division was composed of National Army drafts from Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Rhode Island and Connecticut. The first units embarked for overseas on July 5, 1918, and the last units arrived in France on July 31, 1918. Upon arrival in France the division was designated as a depot division and ordered to the St. Aignan area. Here the division was broken up, training cadres were formed and the personnel used as replacements for combat divisions at the front. The special units, such as the Signal Battalion and Sanitary Troops, were sent forward as corps and army troops.

Commanding generals: Maj.Gen. H. F. Hodges,. Aug. 25 to Nov. 27, 1917; Brig. Gen. Wm. Wiegel, Nov. 27, 1917 to Feb. 13, 1918; Maj. Gen. H. F. Hodges, Feb.13 to Nov. 11,1918.

This division was composed of the following organizations: 15ast and 152nd Inf. Brigs.; 301st, 302nd, 303rd, 304th Inf. Regts.; 301st, 302d, 303d Machine Gun Bns.; 301st, 302d, 303d Fld. Arty. Regts.; 301st Trench Mortar Battery; 301st Engr. Regt. and Train; 301st Fld. Sig. Bn.; 301st Hqs. Train and M. P.; 301st Amm. Train; 301st Supply Train; 301st Sanitary Train (301st, 302d, 303d and 304th Field Hospitals and Amb. Cos.).


Seventy-Seventh Division (National Army)

Named the "Metropolitan Division." Insignia, a gold Statue of Liberty on a truncated triangle of flag blue. Organized August 30th at Camp Upton. The majority were from New York City and the enlisted men were sent from New York City and Long Island, New York. On Oct. 10, 1917, many of the men were transferred to Camp Upton and Camp Greenwood, the vacancies caused thereby being filled by men from Camp Devens, Mass., and from Northern New York State. The division began leaving Camp Upton on March 28, 1918, and sailed from Boston, Portland (Maine), via Halifax and New York City. With the exception of the artillery, all units proceeded through Liverpool, across England and landed at Calais, France. The artillery sailed from New York in April and went direct to Brest, France.

The division moved immediately to a training area back of the British front near St. Omer and while being trained by the 39th British Division, was held in reserve to meet the anticipated German attack against the channel ports which never materialized. The artillery brigade on arrival moved to an American training area at Souges. On June 16, 1918, the division moved by train to the Baccarat sector. On July 12, 1918, the artillery brigade relieved the French artillery in the Baccarat sector. During the time spent in this sector the division held a broad frontage.

On Aug. 4th, the division moved to the Vesle sector in the neighborhood of Fismes, on Aug. 11th, entering the line. With French troops on both flanks and forming a part of the 6th French Army, the division commenced the attack of the German positions north of the River Vesle on Aug. 18th, crossing the Vesle on Sept. 5th, and advanced its left flank to the River Aisne. The division was relieved Sept. 15th, moving for two days rest to the region of Arcy-le-Poin Sart. Division began moving Sept. 17th by bus and marching to St. Menehould. On Sept. 21st, elements of the division moved into position in the Argonne trenches. By Sept. 25th the whole division was in position and on Sept. 26th attacked on the left of the 1st American Army in the Argonne forest. On Oct. 15th and 16th, the division was relieved and concentrated in the vicinity east of Cornay (1st Corps Reserve) where it was held in readiness for immediate use if required. During this time the division troops were employed in reorganizing the line of defense. On Oct. 25th, the division relieved a line division and continued in the attack until Nov. 12th, advancing from St. Juvin to the Meuse. Division was relieved Nov. 12th and moved to the vicinity of Les Vignettes on Nov. 21st, and thence proceeded on Nov. 30th to the 9th training area and established division headquarters at Chateau Villain.

The division captured from the enemy the following: 13 officers, 737 men, 44 pieces of artillery, 323 machine guns and numerous supplies. The 77th Division made a total advance against resistance of 71.5 kilometers. Battle deaths, 1,990; wounded, 9,966; prisoners of war, 404. Distinguished Service Crosses awarded 146.

Commanding general: Maj. Gen. J. Franklin Bell, Aug. 18, 1917 to May 18, 1918; Maj. Gen. Geo. B. Duncan, May 18 to Aug. 24, 1918; Brig. Gen. Evan M. Johnson, Aug. 24 to Aug. 31, 1918; Maj. Gen. Robert Alexander, Aug. 31 to Nov. 11, 1918.
The units comprising the 77th Division were as follows: 153d, 154th Inf. Brigs., 305th, 306th, 307th, 308th Inf. Regts., 305th Machine Gun Bn., 152d Arty Brig., 304th, 305th, 306th Arty. Regts., 302d Trench Mortar Battery, 304th Div. Machine Gun Bn., 302d Engr. Regt. And Train, 302d Fld. Sig. Bn., 302d Train Hqs. And M.P., 302d Supply Train, 302d Amm. Train, 302d Sanitary Train (305th, 306th, 307th, 308th Amb. Cos. And Field Hospitals).

The well known "Lost Battalion" was a part of the 308th Infantry of this division.


Seventy-eighth Division (National Army)

Known as the "Lightning Division." Insignia, crimson semi-cfrcle with lightning flash in white. Organized about Aug. 25, 1917, at Camp Dix, New Jersey. The majority of the officers were from New York State and were trained at Madison Barracks. Enlisted personnel from northern New York State, New Jersey and Delaware. About the middle of Oct., 1917, the division began the gradual transfer of over 13,000 enlisted men, more or less trained, to other camps. On May 8, 1918, the division began movement overseas. The artillery brigade landed in France and proceeded to Brittany for training. The infantry units landed in England on June 4th and 5th, and crossed to Calais, three or four days later. The last units of the division arrived in France June 11, 1918.

Infantry units began training June 17, 1918, behind the Hazebrouck front in the British area. On July 19th, the division moved to an area east of St. Pol and trained there until Aug., 19th, when the infantry units moved to the Bourbonne-les Bains area. On Aug. 31st, the division began moving to the St. Mihiel front, arriving Sept. l0th. It remained in 1st Corps Reserve until Sept. 15th and 16th, when it relieved the 2nd and 5th Divisions. The artrncry brigade had meanwhile come up to this front and was supporting the 90th Division. The division occupied the Limey sector until Oct. 4th when it was relieved and rejoined by the artillery brigade, moved to the Argonne forest. The division relieved the 77th Division on Oct. 16th and continued in the line until Nov. 5th, advancing twenty-one kilometers. On Nov. 6th the division, less artillery brigade and ammunition train, moved back to the Argonne camps west of Varennes, then to Florent, Les Islettes and to the south of St. Menenhould. It entrained for the Semur training area-on Nov. 15th.

This division captured from the enemy, 9 officers, 392 men, several pieces of artillery, numerous machine guns and quantities of other military supplies. It made a total advance against resistance of twenty-one kilometers or about thirteen miles. Casualties, 813, of which 63 were prisoiners of war. Distinguished Service Crosses awarded, 95.

Commanding generals: Maj.-Gen. Chase W. Kennedy, Aug. 23 to Dec. 27, 1917; Maj. Gen. Hugh L. Scott, Dec. 28, 1917 to March 15, 1918; Brig.-Gen. Jas. T. Dean, March 16 to April 20, 1918; Maj. Gen. Jas H. McRae, April 20 to Nov.11, 1918.

The.units composing the division were as follows: 115th, 156th Inf. Brigs., 309th, 3l0th, 311th, 312th Inf. Regts., 308th, 309th Machine Gun Bns., 153d Arty. Brig., 307th, 308th, 309th Arty. Regts., 303d Trench Mortar Battery, 307th Div. Machine Gun Bn., 303d Engr. Regt. And Train, 303d Fld. Sig. Bn., 303d Train Hqs and M.P., 303d Supply Train, 303d Amm. Train, 303d Sanitary Train (309th, 310th, 311th, 312th Amb. Cos. And Field Hospitals).


Seventy-Ninth Division (National Army)

Known as the "Liberty Division." Insignia, a gray Lorraine cross on a blue shield-shaped field, the whole outlined in gray. Organized Aug. 25, 1917, at Camp Meade, Md. The officers for the most part were from Pennsylvania and the selected men in the early increments were drawn from eastern Pennsylvania, Maryland and the District of Columbia. Beginning about this time large number of men were transferred to southern divisions and to special units throughout the United States. This continued until June, 1918. Approximately 80,000 men were trained in this division and only about 25,000 retained. The later increments came from New York, Ohio, Rhode Island and West Virginia. Commenced its overseas movement July 9, 1918, the majority embarking at Hoboken, and debarking at Brest. The 154th Fld. Arty. Brigade embarked at Philadelphia and debarked in England, proceeding from there to a training area in France. The last units arrived in France, Aug. 3, 1918. This artillery brigade joined the division after the armistice.

The division left Brest for the twelfth training area, but were diverted to the tenth training area around Prauthoy and Champlite. Left the training area for the Robert Espagne area by rail. Subsequently proceeding by bus on Sept. 16th relieved a division in sector 304 (Montfaucon).

The 79th Division under the 5th Corps made its first offensive in the Mense-Argonne drive, advancing through Haucourt and Malancourt. On Sept. 27th they passed through Montfaucon and on Sept. 29th through Nantillois. They were relieved in this sector on Sept. 30th and passed to the command of the 2nd Colonial French Corps., moving Oct. 8th to the Troyon sector (Frenes-en-Woevre-Doncourt). Were relieved in this sector Oct. 26, 1918. Entered the Grand Montagne Sector (right of Meuse) and participated in the second phase of the Meuse-Argonne offensive, under the 17th French Corps, advancing through Borne-du-Cornouiller (Hill 376) on Nov. 6th, and through Damvillers and Wavrille on Nov. 9th. Ville-devant-Chaumont was passed on Nov. 11th. The division remained in same location and also took over area from Meuse river to Eresnes-en-Woevre until Nov. 26th. Moved to Souilly area south of Verdun, Dec. 27th.

Casualties, 3,223. Distinguished Service Crosses awarded, 80.

Maj. Gen. Joseph E. Kuhn, U.S.A., commanded the division from Aug. 25, 1917.


Eightieth Division (National Army)

Known as the "Blue Ridge Division." Insignia, a shield outlined in white on a khaki background with three blue mountains superimposed. Organized August 27, 1917 at Camp Lee, Va. The majority of the officers were from New Jersey, Maryland, and Virginia, and the enlisted men from Western Pennsylvania, Virginia and West Virginia. The division began leaving Camp Lee on May 17, 1918, and was embarked at Newport News for France. Its principal points of entry werre St. Nazaire, Bordeaux, and Brest. The assembly point of the division was Calais, from which place it departed early in June for the Samur training area, with the British. The artillery was not trained in this area but rejoined the division September 13th. The last units of the division arrived in France June 19, 1918.

Division left Samur training area on July 4th, for Third British Army sector, where it arrived July 5th. All units trained with the British in the Artois sector; while in this sector the troops were attached to the British and were on active duty. On August 18th the units of the division proceeded by rail to the forteenth training area. On Sept. 1st it moved to the Stainville and late to Tronville area as reserve during the St. Mihiel operation. During this time one infantry regiment and one machine gun battalion were serving with the French, taking part in active operations. Commencing Sept. 14th, the division moved into the Argonne and began its preparations for the offensive in that region. On September 16th, in conjunction with other American divisions, it attacked at Bethincourt, advancing a distance of nine kilometers in two days. On Sept. 29th it was relieved and assembled in the vicinity of Ouisy, where on Oct. 4th it again attacked, and over difficult ground attained a distance of four kilometers in nine days. On Oct. 12th the division was again relieved and proceeded by march and bus to the Thiaucourt area where it was re-equipped. On Oct. 29th, making preparations for the resumption of the Meuse-Argonne offensive. The division, on Oct. 29th, entered the line St. Georges-St. Juvin and on Nov. 1st made an attack on that line, penetrating in the next five days a distance of twenty-four kilometers, being relieved the morning of November 6th. Upon relief it proceeded by marching to the Buzancy and Champ Mahaut areas. On the 18th of Nov. The division proceeded by march to the fifteenth training area, completing the march Dec. 1st.

The 155th F.A. Brigade after its relief from duty with the 80th Division, remained in the Cunel sector, servinv successively with American divisions in that sector. It was in actor for forty-eight consecutive fighting days. It proceeded by rail from Dun-sur-Meuse to the 15th training aarea, arriving Dec. 4th to 7th.

Battle deaths, 1,141; wounded 5,622; prisoners 101. Distinguished Service Crosses awarded 42.

Maj. Gen. Adelbert Cronkhite, U.S. Army, commanded the division from Sept. 9, 1917.

The following units composed the division: 159th and 160th Inf. Brigs., 317th, 318th, 319th, 320th Inf. Regts., 314th, 315th M.G. Bns., 155th Art. Brig., 313th, 314th, 315th Arty. Regts. 305th Trench Mortar Battery, 313 Div. Machine Gun Bn., 305th Engr. Regt and Train, 305th Fld Sig. Bn., 305th Train Hqs., and M.P., 305th Supply Train, 205th Amm. Train, 305th Sanitary Train (317th, 318th, 319th, 320th Amb. Cos. And Field Hospitals.)


Eighty-First Division (National Army)

Insignia, a silhouette of a wildcat on a khaki circle. The color of the wildcat varies according to the different arms of the serivce. Organized at Camp Jackson, S.C., in Sept. 1917. This division was made up on National Army drafts from North and South Carolina and Tennessee. The first units embarked for overseas on July 30, 1918, and the last units arrived in France, via England, on Aug. 26, 1918. Upon arrival in France the division was ordered to the Tonnerre (Yonne) training area where it remained in training until the middle of August. The division then proceeded to the St. Die sector (Vosges) where it held the line as a part of the 33d French Corps. On Oct. 19th the division was relieved and ordered to join the 1st Army for the Meuse-Argonne offensive. The division arrived in the Sommedieue sector early in November and was attached to the 2d Colonial Corps (French, as reserve). On Nov. 6th, it relieved the 35th Division in this sector and on Nov. 9th the division attacked the German positions on the Woevre plain, and was in the line when the armistice was signed. On Nov. 18th the division moved to the vicinity of Chantillon-Sur-Seine (cote D'or) and the artillery brigade which had heretofore formed a part of the 8th Corps, rejoined the division. On May 2d the division was placed under the control of the C.G., S.O.S., for return to the United States.

This division captured the following from the enemy: 5 officers, 96 men, 44 machine guns. The division advanced five and a half kilometers against resistance. Battle deaths, 250, wounded 801; taken prisoners, 51. Distinguished Service Crosses awarded 19.

Commanding Generals: Brig. Gen. Chas. H. Barth, Aug. 25 to Oct. 8, 1917; Maj. Gen. Chas. J. Bailey Oct. 8, 1917 to Nov. 11, 1918.

The following units composed the division: 161st, 162nd Inf. Brigs., 321st, 322d, 323d, 324 Inf. Regts., 317th, 318th Machine Gun Bns., 156th Arty. Brig., 316th, 317th, 318th Arty Regts., 306 Trench Mortar Battery, 316th Div. Machine Gun Bn., 306th Engr. Regt., and Train, 306th Fld Sig. Bn., 306th Trian Hqs and M.P., 306th Amm. Train, 306th Sanitary Train, 306th Supply Train, (321st, 322d, 323d, 324th Amb. Cos. And Field Hospitals).


 Eighty-Second Division (National Army)

Known as the "All American Division." Insignia, the letters "A A" in gold on a circle of blue, the whole superimposed on a red square. Organized Aug. 25, 1917, at Camp Gordon, Ga. The majority of officers were from Georgia, Alabama and Florida. The enlisted men were from Georgia, Alabama and Tennessee. On Oct. 10th the majority of the enlisted men were transferred out of the divsion to other divisions and newly drafted men were sent from Camps Devens, Upton, Dix, Meade and Lee, which resulted in there being in the division, men from every state in the Union, but principally the eastern states. The division began leaving Camp Gordon on April 9th, the movement continuing until May, and was through Camp Upton and England, except the artillery which landed in France. The first units left the United States April 25, 1918, and the last units arrived in France June 1, 1918. The main port of entry was Le Havre. Units, except artillery, engineers and signal corps, trained with the British in Escarbotin area, west of Abbeville. The artillery was trained at La Courtine.

The division left Escarbotin June 16th and entered the Toul sector with a French Division on June 27th, occupied this quiet sector alone from July 18, 1918 to Aug. 9th, moved to Blanod les Toul training area, taking over the Sector Marbache, astride the Moselle on Aug. 19th and occupied it until Sept. 21st. This was a quiet sector except during the battle of St. Mihiel from Sept. 12th to 18th. Moved to the Thiaucourt area, west of Verdun by bus, and on Oct. 6th entered actively the Meuse-Argeonne offensive, north of Varennes, continued in this offensive until Oct. 30th, when it was withdrawn to the vicinity of Chene Tondu and Camp Bouzon. Thence on Nov. 2nd to Florent-Les Islettes area, thence to Vaucouleurs training area, Nov. 4th, Beaumont training area, Nov. 10th and to the tenth training area, on Nov. 15th (Prauthoy). Sailed from Bordeaux in April 1919.

Casualties 8,300, of which 169 were prisoners of war. Distinguished Service Crosses awarded 34.

Commanding generals: Maj-Gen. Eben Swift, Aug. 25, 1917 to May, 1918; Brig. Gen. Wm. P. Burnham , May to Oct. 10, 1918; Maj. Gen. Geo. B. Duncan, Oct. 10 to Oct. 17, 1918; Maj. Gen. Wm. P. Burnham, Oct. 24 to Nov. 7, 1918; Maj. Gen. Geo. B. Duncan Nov. 7 to 11, 1918.

The following units composed the division: 163d, 164th Inf. Brig., 325th, 326th, 327th, 328th Inf. Regts., 319th, 320th, 321st Machine Gun Bns., 157th Arty. Brig., 319th, 320th, 321st Arty Regts., 307th Trench Mortar Battery, 307th Engr. Regt. And Train, 307th Train Hqs. And M.P. 307th Fld. Sig. Bn., 307th Supply Train, 307th Amm. Train, 307th Sanitary Train (325th, 326th, 327th, 328th Ambulance Companies and Field Hospitals).


Eighty-Third Division (National Army)

Insignia, a black triangle on which is superimposed a golden momogram of the letters O,H,I, O. Organized at Camp Sherman, Ohio, in Sept. 1917. The division was composed of drafted men from Ohio and West Virginia. First units embarked for overseas on June 4th and the last units arrived in France on June 21st. Upon arrival in France the division was designated as a depot division and was ordered to the LeMans area. Here the division was broken up and the artillery brigade and special units, such as engineer and signal troops were sent forward as corps and army troops. The other organizations of the division were held in the area and trained as replacements for the combat divisions at the front. Returned to U.S. Jan. 1919.

Maj. Gen. Edwin F. Glenn commanded this division from the time of its organization until it was demobilized.

The division was composed of the following organizations: 165th and 166th Inf. Brigs., 158th Arty. Brig., 329th, 330th, 331st, 332d Inf. Regts., 322d, 323d, 324th Machine Gun Bns., 32ssd, 323, 324th Fld. Arty Regts., 308th Trench Mortar Battery, 308th Engr. Regt. And Train, 308th Supply Train, 308th Sanitary Train (329th, 330th, 331st, 332d Amb. Cos. And Field Hospitals).


Eighty-Fourth Division (National Army)

Popularly known as the "Lincoln Division." Insignia, a white disk, surrounded by a red circle, on which is superimposed "Lincoln 84" in blue and a axe with a red head and a blue handle. A red battle axe was also the symbol of this division. Organized at Camp Taylor, Kentucky, in Sept., 1917. The division was composed of National Army drafts from Indiana and Kentucky, and remained in training at Camp Taylor until Aug., 1918. Upon arrival in France, the division was desginaged as a depot division and ordered to the LeMans area. Here the division was broken up and cadres were formed for training the personnel as replacements for combat divisions at the front. Returned to the U.S. in Jan., 1919.

Commanding generals were: Brig.Gen. Wilbert E. Wilder, Aug. 25, to Oct. 6, 1917; Maj. Gen. Harry C. Hale, Oct. 6, 1917 to Nov. 11, 1918.

This division was composed of the following organizations: 167th and 168th Inf. Brigs., 159th Fld. Arty. Birg. 133d, 134th, 135th, 136th Inf. Regts., 125th, 126th, 127th Machine Guns Bns., 325th, 326th, 327th Fld. Arty. Regts., 309th Trench Mortar Battery, 309th Engr Regt. And Train, 309th Fld. Sig. Bn., 309th Hqs. Train and M.P., 309th Supply Train, 309th Amm. Train, 309th Sanitary Train (333d, 334th, 335th, 336th Amb. Cos. And Field Hospitals).


Eighty-fifth Division (National Army)

Popularly known as the "Custer Division." Insignia, a khaki circle on which are superimposed the letters "C D" in red. Organized at Camp Custer, Mich., in Oct., 1917. The division was composed of drafted men from Michigan and Wisconsin. First units embarked for overseas on July 21, 1918, and the last units arrived in France on Aug. 12, 1918. Upon arrival in France the division was designated as a depot division and ordered to Pouilly (Nievre). The division was then broken up and the special units were sent forward as corps and army troops. The infantry units were formed into training cadres for sending forward replacements to the combat division at the front.

Commanding generals: Maj.Gen. J. T. Dickman, Aug. 17 to Nov. 24, 1917; Brig. Gen. S. W. Miller, Nov. 24 to Dec. 13, 1917; Maj. Gen. Jas. Parker, Dec. 13, 1917, to Feb. 21, 1918; Brig. Gen. Benj. C. Morse, Feb. 21 to 27, 1918; Maj. Gen. C. W. Kennedy, Feb. 27 to Nov. 11, 1918.

This division was composed of the following organizations: 169th and 170th Inf. Brigs. 160th Fld. Arty Brig., 337th, 338th, 339th, 340th Inf. Regts., 328th, 329th and 330th Machine Gun Bns. 328th, 329th, 330th Fld Arty. Regts., 310th Hqs. Train and M. P., 310th Amm. Train; 310th Sanitary Train (Amb Cos. And Field Hospitals No.s 337, 338, 339 and 340).


Eighty-sixth Division (National Army)

Popularly known as the "Black Hawk Division." Insignia, a black hawk and the monogram "B H" superimposed on a red shield. Organized at Camp Grant, Ill., in Sept., 1917. This division was composed of drafted men from Illinois. First units embarked for overseas on Sept. 8, 1918, and the last units arrived in France on Oct. 28th. Upon arrival in France the division was ordered to the LeMans area where it was broken up and cadres were formed for training replacements for combat divisions at the front.

Commanding generals were: Maj. Gen. Thos. H. Barry, Aug. 25, 1917 to Mar. 14. 1918; Brig. Gen. L. W. V. Kennon, Mar. 14 to April 17, 1918; Maj. Gen. Chas. H. Martin, April 18 to Nov. 11, 1918.

The division was composed of the following organizations: 171st and 172nd Inf. Brigs., 161st Arty. Brig., 341st, 342nd, 343d, 344th Inf. Regts., 331st, 332d, 333d Machine Gun Bns., 331st, 332d, 333d Fld. Arty. Regts., 311th Trench Mortar Battery, 311th Engr. Regt. And Train, 311th Fld. Sig. Bn., 311th Hqs Train and M.P., 311th Amm. Train, 311th Supply Train, 311th Sanitary Train (341st, 342d, 343d, 344th Amb. Cos. And Field Hospitals).


Eighty-seventh Division (National Army)

Popularly known as the "Acorn Division." Insignia, a brown acorn on a green circle. Organized as Camp Pike, Ark., in Sept., 1917. This division was composed of drafted men from Arkansas, Louisiana, and Mississippi. It remained in training at Camp Pike until June, 1918, when it was sent to Camp Dix, N. J. The first units embarked for overseas on Aug. 23rd and the last units arrived in France on Sept. 13th. Upon arrival in France the division was turned over to the Service of Supply and ordered to Pons (Charente-Inferieure) where it was broken up and the units placed on various work in the intermediate section. The cadres of the division returned to the U.S. in Dec., 1918.

Commanding generals: Maj-Gen. Samuel D. Sturgis, Aug. 26 to Nov. 26, 1917; Brig. Gen. Robt. C. Van Vliet, Nov. 27, 1917 to March 10, 1918; Maj. Gen. Samuel D. Sturgis, March 10 to Nov. 11, 1918.

This division was composed of the following organizations: 173d and 174th Inf. Brigs., 162d Fld. Arty. Brig., 345th, 346th, 347th, 348th Inf. Regts., 334th, 335th, 336th Machine Gune Bns., 334th, 335th, 336th Fld. Arty Regts., 312th Trench Mortar Battery, 312th Fld. Sig. Bn., 312th Engr. Regt. And Train, 312th Sanitary Train (Amb. Cos. And Field Hospitals Nos. 345, 346, 347 and 348).


Eighty-Eighth Division (National Army)

Insignia, two figure "8's" in blue crossed at right angles. Organized at Camp Dodge Iowa, in Sept., 1917. This division was composed of National Army drafts from North and South Dakota, Minnesota, Nebraska, Iowa, and Illinois. First units embarked for overseas on Aug. 8th and the last units arrived in France on Sept. 9th. Upon arrival in France the division was ordered to the twenty-first training area at Semur (Cote d'Or), except the artillery, which was sent to the vicinity of Bordeaux for training. On Sept. 14th the division was placed under the command of the 4th French Army and moved by rail to the Hericourt training area near Belfort and on Sept. 23d relieved the 38th French Division in the center sector (Haute-Alsace). The division held this sector until Nov. 2d, when it was placed under the 4th American Corps and moved to the Lagney area (Meurth et Moselle) as part of the 2d Army Reserve, where it was located at the time of the armistive. On Nov. 29th the division moved by marching to the first divisional training area at Gondrecourt (Meuse). On April 26, 1919, the control of the division passed to the C.G., S.O.S. Arrived in the U.S. on June 1st. The artillery did not rejoin the division but remained in training in the south of France until after the armistice, and was returned to the the U.S. in Jan. 1919.

Battle deaths, 27, wounded 63; number taken prisoners 2 officer and 7 men.

Commanding generals: Maj. Gen. Edward H. Plummer, Aug. 25 to Nov. 26, 1917; Brig. Gen. R. N. Getty, Nov. 26, 1917 to Feb. 9, 1918; Maj. Gen. Edward H. Plummer Feb. 19 to March 14, 1918 Brig. Gen. R. N. Getty, March 15 to May 23, 1918; Brig. Gen. Wm. D. Beach May 24 to Sept. 28, 1918; Maj. Gen. Wm. Weigel, Sept. 28 to Oct. 24, 1918; Brig. Gen. Wm. D. Beach, Oct. 24 to Nov. 7, 1918; Maj. Gen. Wm. Weigel, Nov. 7 to 11, 1918.

This division was composed of the following organizations: 156th, 157th Inf. Brigs., 163d Arty Brigs., 349th, 350th, 351st, 352d Inf. Regts., 337th, 338th, 339th Machine Gun Bns., 337th, 338th, 339th Fld. Arty. Regts., 313th Trench Mortar Battery, 313th Engr. Regt. And Train, 313th Fld. Sig. Bn., 313th Hqs. Train and M.P., 313th Supply Train, 313th Amm. Train, 313th Sanitary Train (349th, 350th, 351st and 352d Amb. Cos. And Field Hospitals).


Eighty-Ninth Division (National Army)

Popularly known as the "Middle West Division." Insignia, a black "W" in a black circle. Different colors are placed in the lower part of the "W" according to the various branches of the service. Organized at Camp Funston, Kansas in Sept. 1917. The division was composed of National Army drafts mainly from Kansas, Missouri and Colorado. In May, 1918, the division moved to Camp Mills, L.I. On June 4th, division headquarters and the majority of the division embarked from New York and the last units arrived in France on July 10th. Upon arrival in France the division was ordered to the Reynel training area (Haute-Marne) except the divisional artillery which was ordered to the Camp Souge, near Bordeaux for training. The division remained in the Reynel area until Aug. 5th when it was moved by bus to the Toul front where it occupied the line between northeast corner of Bois de Bauchot to the middle of the Etang de Vorgevaux and was supported by the 55th Fld. Arty and 250th Regiment French Fld. Arty.

On Sept. 12th the division participated in the St. Mihiel offensive as the right division of the 4th American Corps and advanced to a depth of twenty-one kilometers including the captures of the towns of Beney, Essey, Boullionville, Pannes and Xammes. On Oct. 7th the division was relieved in the Pannes-Flirey-Limey sector by the 37th Division and was moved by bus to the Recicourt area and became part of the 1st Army Reserve. On Oct. 12th the division moved forward in rear of the 32d Division as part of the 5th American Corps in the Argonne offensive and on Oct. 20th the division went into the line along the Sommerance-Romagne road just north of the Kreimhilde defense positions. The division attacked on November 1st and continued in the assault until the armistive was signed when it had crossed the Meuse north of Stenay.

The division was placed under the 7th Corps of the 3rd Army and on Nov. 24th began its march into Germany. The division was assigned the area bounded by Kreise of Prum, Bitburg, Trier, and Saarburg with division headquarters at Kyllburg where it was joined by the divisional artillery which had been serving with the 28th Division. On May 19, 1919, the division sailed for the U.S. and debarked at New York. It was then sent to Camp Funston, Kansas, where it was demobilized shortly afterwards.

The division captured from the enemy the following, 5,061 prisoners, 127 pieces of artillery, 455 machine guns. The division advanced thirty-six pieces of artillery, 455 machine guns. The division advanced thirty-six kilometers against resistance. Battle deaths 1,419, wounded, 7,394; number taken prisoners 1 officer and 24 men. The following decorations were awarded to individuals of this division: Congressional Medal of Honor, 8; Distinguished Service Crosses, 119, Distinguished Service Medals, 2; Croix de Guerre, 55; Belgian Cross L'Ordre Leopold, 1; Belgian Croix de Guerre, 2.

Commanding generals: Maj. Gen. Leonard Wood, Aug. 27, 1917 to Nov. 26, 1917; Brig. Gen. Frank L. Winn, Nov. 26, 1917 to April 12, 1918; Maj. Gen. Leonard Wood, April 12 to May 24, 1918; Brig. Gen. Frank L. Winn, May 24, 1918 to Sept. 14, 1918; Maj. Gen. Wm. M. Wright, Sept. 14, 1918 to Oct. 24, 1918; Maj. Gen. Frank L. Winn. Oct. 24, 1918 to Nov. 11, 1918

The division was composed of the following organizations: 177th and 178th Inf. Brigs; 164th Arty. Brig. 353d, 354th, 355th and 356th Inf. Regts.; 340th, 341st 342d Machine Gun Bns; 340th, 341st, 342d Fld. Arty. Regts; 314th Trench Mortar Battery; 314th Engr. Regt. And Train; 314th Fld. Sig. Bn.; 314th Hqs. Train and M.P.; 314th Amm. Train; 314th Supply Train; 314th Sanitary Train (Field Hospital and Amb. Cos. Nos. 353, 354, 355, 356).


Ninetieth Division (National Army)

Known as the "Alamo Division." Insignia, red monogram of letters "T" and "O", symbolizing Texas and Oklahoma, the native states of the first members of the division. Organized Aug. 25, 1917, at Camp Travis, Texas, under the command of Maj. Gen. Henry T. Allen. All of the first men in the division were from Texas and Oklahoma, those from Oklahoma being in the 179th Brigade and those from Texas in the 180th Brigade. From that time these brigades have been known as the Oklahoma and Texas Brigades. The 90th sent away great numbers of men to fill up Regular and National Guard divisions and to form special organizations of army, corps, and S.O.S. troops. The division was filled up with men from other camps, a large number coming from Camp Dodge, Iowa. The division commenced leaving Camp Travis early in June for Camp Mills. By June 30th all units had sailed from Hoboken. A few organizations went direct to France but the majority of the division landed in England. The 358th Infantry paraded before the Lord Mayor of Liverpool on July 4th, and was given a banquet by the city. Upon arrival in France the artillery brigade was sent to a training area near Bordeaux. The rest of the division was moved by train to the Aignay-le-Duc training area, northeast of Dijon. Headquarters of the division, 179th Brigade and 357th Infantry were at Aigany-le-Duc. Headquarters of the 180th Brigade and the 359th Infantry were at Recey-sur-Ource. The 358th Infantry was at Minot, and the 360th Infantry was at Rouvres. The division stayed six weeks in this area, training eight hours a day for the time when it should take its place in line.

The average advance made by the division in the St. Mihiel operation was six kilometers, in the Meuse-Argonne twenty-two kilometers; the division was under fire from Aug. 20th to Nov. 11th with the exception of seven days occupied in changing sectors; seventy-five days without a relief. During this time it went over the top in two major offensives and seven minor operations, and was still advancing when halted by the armistice. Formed part of Army of Occupation.

The division captured 42 pieces of artillery, 36 trench mortars, 294 machine guns, 903 rifles and immense quantities of ammunition and stores. It took as prisoners 32 officers and 1,844 men. Casualties amounted to 37 officers and 1,042 men killed, 62 officers and 1,257 men severely wounded; 123 officers and 4,671 men slightly wounded; 81 officers and 2,094 men gassed. The division received give official commendations for its individual work in the St. Mihiel and Meuse- Argonne operations. Never gave up a foot of ground to the enemy. Distinguished Service Crosses awarded, 57.


Ninety-First Division (National Army)

91st Division PatchInsignia, a green fir tree, emblematic of the Far West. The division is known as the "Wild West Division." Organized Aug. 25, 1917, at Camp Lewis, Washington. The majority of the officers were from California, Washington and Oregon. The enlisted men from California, Oregon, Washington, Utah, Idaho, Nevada, Montana, and Alaska. The division began leaving June 19, 1918, for overseas, the move continuing until early in July and was through Camp Merritt, Camp Mills, England and France. First units sailed July 6, 1918, and the last units arrived in France July 26, 1918. All units of the division, artillery excepted, were trained in the eighth training area. The artillery was trained in the vicinity of Clermont-Ferrand.

The division left the eighth area, Sept. 6, 1918, and from Sept. 11th to 14th constituted a part of the reserves in the St. Mihiel offensive, moving thence to the northwest of Verdun, where it took part in the Meuse-Argonne offensive, Sept. 26th, advancing from west of Avocourt to north of Gesnes. Continued in the offensive until Oct. 6th, when it moved to the Nattancourt area. One bridge stayed in the line with the 1st Division until Oct. 16th. On Oct. 19th, the division passed to the command of the King of Belgium. From Oct. 31st to Nov. 4th, the division, under the direction of the French Army in Belgium, took part in the Lys-Scheldt offensive west of the Escaut (Scheldt) river in the vicinity of Audenarde. Nov. 10th and 11th, took part in the Lys-Scheldt offensive east of the Escaut (Scheldt) river in the vicinity of Audenarde. Nov. 22, 1918, detachment of division participated in the ceremony in connection with the entrance into the City of Brussels of the King and Queen of Belgium. In Dec. 1918 and Jan. 1919, the division moved to the LeMans area. In March and April, it embarked for the U.S.

Casualties 5,838, of which 23 were prisoners of war. Distinguished Service Crosses awarded, 19. German prisoners captured, 2,412.

Commanding general: Maj. Gen. Harry A. Greene, Aug. 25 to Nov. 24, 1917; Brig. Gen. Jas. A. Iron, Nov. 24 to Dec. 23, 1917; Brig. Gen. Frederick S. Foltz, Dec. 23, 1917 to March 2, 1918; Maj. Gen. Harry A. Green, March 2 to June 19, 1918; Brig. Gen. Frederick S. Foltz, June 19 to Aug. 31, 1918; Maj. Gen. Wm. H. Johnston, Aug. 31 to Nov. 11, 1918.

The units composing the division are as follows: 181st and 182d Inf. Brigs, 361st, 362d, 363d, 364th Inf. Regts. 347th, 348th Machine Guns Bns., 166th Arty. Brig., 346th, 347th, 348th Arty. Regts., 316th Trench Mortar Battery, 346th Div. Machine Gun Bn., 316th Engr. Regt and Train, 316th Fld. Sig. Bn., 316th Train Hqs and M.P., 316th Supply Train, 316th Amm. Train, Sanitary Train (361st, 362d, 363d, 364th Amb Cos. And Field Hospitals).

[See here for detailed history of the 91st Division American Expeditionary Force, World War I]


Ninety-Second Division (National Army)

Popularly known as the "Buffaloes." Insignia, a buffalo in a black circle on khaki patch. Organized Oct. 29th at Camps Funston, Grant, Dodge, Upton, Meade and Dix. The officers and enlisted men coming from all parts of the United States.

On June 2, 1918, the division was assembled at Camp Upton for embarkation. From June 10th to 27, 1918, the division embarked at Hoboken. On June 19, 1918, the division headquarters arrived at Brest, France. On Aug. 29, 1918, after a period of training the division entered the line at St. Die in the quiet Vosges sector. Relived on Sept. 20th. From Sept. 25th to 30th, the division was in the reserve of the 1st Army Corps in the Argonne-Meuse sector. From Sept. 24th to 30th, the 368th Infantry was brigaded with the 11th Curassiers under command of the 38th Army Corps (French), forming the liasion detachment between the French and American armies. Oct. 9th, it was in line in the Marbach sector astride the Moselle river from Oct. 9th to Nov. 15th. The artillery brigade joined the division Oct. 23, 1918.

Battle deaths 185, wounded 1,495, prisoners, 17. Distinguished Service Crosses awarded, 21.

Commanding generals: Brig. Gen. Chas. C. Ballou, Oct. 30 to Nov. 20, 1917; Brig. Gen. John E. McMahon, Nov. 23 to Dec. 3, 1917; Maj. Gen. Chas. C. Ballou, Dec. 3, 1917 to Jan. 12, 1918; Brig. Gen. Jas. B. Erwin, Jan 12 to March 12, 1918; Maj. Gen. Chas. C. Ballou, March 12 to Nov. 11, 1918.

The units composing the division were as follows: 183d and 184th Inf. Brigs., 365th, 366th, 367th, 368th Inf. Regts., 350th, 351st Machine Gun Bns., 167th Arty. Brig., 349th, 350th, and 351st Arty. Regts., 317th Trench Mortar Battery, 349th Div. Machine Gun Bn., 317th Engr. Regt. And Train, 325th Fld. Sig. Bn., 317th Train Hqs. And M.P., 317th Supply Train, 317th Amm. Train, 317th Sanitary Train (365th, 366th, 367th and 368th Amb. Cos. And Field Hospitals).


Ninety-Third Division (National Army — Colored)

93rd Division PatchInsignia, a French helmet in blue, superimposed on a black disc. Organized at Camp Stuart, Newport News, Va., in Jan. 1918. The nucleus of the division was made up from the following units: 1st Sep. Co. Conn. Inf.; 1st Sep. Bn. D.C.Inf.; 8th Ill. Inf.; 1st Sep. Co. Md. Inf.; 1st Sep. Co. Mass. Ing.,; 15th N.Y. Inf.; 9th Sep. Bn. Ohio Inf.; 1st Sep. Co. Tenn. Inf. This division was never organized to its full strength, only the 185th and 186th Infantry Brigades being formed. First united embarked for overseas on April 7, 1918, and the last units arrived in France on April 22, 1918. Upon arrival in France the two brigades consisting of the 369th, 370th, 371st and 372d Infantry Regiments, were broken up and brigaded with the French.

These regiments served in France as follows: July 1st to July 21st: 369th Inf. With 4th French Army in the line between Aisne and Ville-sur-Tourbe; 370th Inf. With 2d French Army; 371st Inf. With 13th French Army Corps in line west of Avocourt; 372d Inf. With the 13th French Army Corps in line east of Four-de-Taris. On Aug. 1st as follows: 369th Inf. With 8th French Army Corps in the Cienne la Ville region; 370th Inf. With 36th French Div.; 371st Inf. With 156th French Div.; 372d Inf. With 157th French Div.; On Sept. 28th the 370th Inf. Advanced across the Chemin-des-Dames. On Oct. 24th as follows: 369th Inf. With 4th French Army at Wesserling; 370th Inf. With 10th French Army at Euly; 371st and 372d Inf. With 2d French Army at Tlainfaing. These regiments returned to the United States in Feb., 1919, and were demobilized shortly afterwards.

Battle deaths, 574, wounded 2,009; number taken prisoner, 1 officer and 3 men.


Nintey-Fourth Division

This unit was never organized, except on paper.


Ninety-Fifth Division (National Army)

95th Division PatchOrganization of the 95th Division was begun at Camp Sherman, Ohio in September, 1918. The artillery brigade and the ammunition train were directed to be organized at Camp Taylor, Kentucky. The organization of the headquarters of all units of the division at Camp Sherman was completed, and equipment as far as obtainable was furnished.

Oders for the demobilization of the division were received during the first week in Decmeber.

Brig. Gen. M. C. Smith commanded the division.

 


Ninety-Sixth Division (National Army)

Organized at Camp Wadsworth, S.C., about the middle of September, 1918.

The following units were organized at Camp Wadsworth: Div. Hqs., 96th Div. Hqs. Troop, 361st Machine Gun B., 192nd Inf. Brig. Hqs., (383d and 384th Inf, 363d Machine Gun Bn.), 321st Sanitary Train. The other Infantry Brigade (1901st), including the machine battalion was to be organized in France from pioneer infantry regiments. The 171st Field Artillery Briade was assigned to this division and was organized at Camp Kearny, California. The brigade bever actually joined the division at Camp Wadsworth. This division was not completely organized and at the time of the signing of the armistice the strength of the entire division was slightly under 3,000 men. Maj. Gen. Guy Carleton was the commanding general of the division.


Ninety-Seventh Division (National Army)

Organized at Camp Cody, Deming, New Mexico.

The division was composed of National Army drafts mainly from Oklahoma and Minnesota. These drafts constituted the personnel of the following units which were organized at Camp Cody: Div. Hqs. 387th and 388th Inf., 622nd Fld. Sig. Bn., 366th Machine Gun Bn., 322d Hqs. Train, and M.P., 322d Sanitary Train. The 172d Field Artillery Brigade consisting of the 61st, 62d, and 63d Field Artillery Regiments, 21st Trench Mortar Battery and 322d Ammunition Train was organized at Camp Jackson, South Carolina, under the command of Brig. Gen. Dennis H. Currie. The nucleus of the 322d Engr. Regt. And Train was formed at Camp Humphrey, Va., but never joined the division. The 193d Infantry Bridge less 365th Machine Gun Battalion and the machine gun companies of the infantry regimetn were to be organized in France. On Nov. 20, 1918, the War Department directed that the division be demobilized. The strength of the division at the time demobilization was commenced was 402 officers and 7,889 men.

Col. C. A. Martin, Inf., commanded the division from Sept. 26, 1918, to Oct. 19, 1918. Brig. Gen. James R. Lindsay was then placed in command of the division and remained in command until demobilization.