History of Virginia - John L. C. Anderson

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John L. C. Anderson

JOHN L. C. ANDERSON. Many of the old and representative families of Smyth County, Virginia, are of Scotch-Irish descent, but have lived so long in the Old Dominion that they are still prouder that they are Virginians. This applies to the Anderson family, of which John L. C. Anderson, treasurer of Smyth County, is a prominent member.

Mr. Anderson was born in Smyth County, on his father's farm near Marion, February 3, 1868, a son of Isaac C. and Eliza Jane (Dungan) Anderson, and a grandson of John Anderson, who was born in Smyth County in 1788 and died here in 1865. He married Catherine Killinger, who was born in this county in 1793, and survived her husband for two years. He was a man of financial importance, owning large estates and many slaves.

Isaac C. Anderson was born March 6, 1819, in Smyth County, and practically spent his life here, his death occurring on his farm near Marion on June 7, 1896. During the last two years of the Civil war he served as a soldier in the Confederate Army. Like his father, he was an extensive farmer and to some degree was active in local republican political circles and served in minor offices. He was a man of sterling character and was a member and strong supporter of the Missionary Baptist Church. He married Eliza Jane Dungan, who was born on a neighboring farm in Smyth County in 1843, and died on the home farm near Marion in March, 1917. They had the following children: Robert, whose borne is at Marion, is connected with the Federal Prohibition Department, with offices at Richmond; John L. C.; Scena, who is the wife of Samuel T. Copenhaver, owner of the Hamilton Bacon Company at Bristol, Virginia, was married first to the late Frank L. Pierce, who was a merchant and farmer; Noah B. C. fills a position in the postoffice at Forest City, Arkansas; and Josle is the wife of Samuel F. Gollehon, and they reside on the old Anderson home farm.

John L. C. Anderson attended the public, schools in Smyth County and was graduated from the high school near Holston Mills in the class of 1886. He then turned his attention to educational work, and for the next nine years taught school in Smyth and adjoining counties. He returned then to the home farm, and on the death of his father inherited a portion of the same, to which he subsequently added and now owns 300 acres of fine blue grass land situated five miles southwest of Marion. This farm is kept in fine condition, and farming and stock raising are profitably carried on. Mr. Anderson's Home on the farm is a commodious, comfortable residence, equipped with many modern conveniences' In political life Mr. Anderson is a republican, and his own party and many others have again and again borne testimony as to the confidence and high regard in which they hold him by electing him to offices of trust and responsibility. He served as commissioner of revenue of the Marion District from 1904 to 1908, and in November, 1907, he was first elected county treasurer of Smyth County, to which high office he has been reelected every four years since. His pres- ent term will expire on January 1, 1924. As a public official his duties have been performed with marked efficiency and scrupulous honesty, arid his entire record is a reflection of sound business judgment and trust-worthiness. Mr. Anderson married in Grayson County, Virginia, on September 9, 1889, Miss Robena Halsey, a daughter of Greenberry B. and Drucie (Hash) Halsey, both of whom are deceased. The father of Mrs. Anderson was a substantial farmer in Grayson County, and she had educational advantages. Mr. and Mrs. Anderson have seven children: Grace, who is the wife of Roy Houston, a farmer in Smyth County; Beulah, who is the wife of Walter R. Blankenbeckler, a carpenter and builder at Worth, West Virginia; Byron who resides with his parents, and is deputy treasurer of Smyth County; Robert Otis, who is a student in the high school at Marion; and Margaret Ann, Robena and Tom D., all of whom are in school. Byron Anderson, of the above family, is a veteran of the World war, and was stationed one year at Camp Lee and was in the Officers Training Camp preparing for overseas service when the armistice was signed. He was graduated from Richmond College in the class of 1918, with the degree of Bachelor of Arts, and is admirably qualified for the office of deputy treasurer of Smyth County.

The Anderson family have been of the Baptist faith for generations, and Mr. Anderson is a member of the South Fork Baptist Church, in which he is a deacon, and takes a deep interest in its various benevolent agencies. For many years he has been a member of Holston Mills Lodge No. 365, Odd Fellows.