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Medical College of Virginia

Richmond, Va.
Medicine
Dentistry
Pharmacy
62nd Session
Catalogue 1898-1899
Announcement 1899-1900

[This phamplet was printed by Whittet & Shepperson, General Printers, Richmond, Va., 1899]

This text is offered on Jeffrey's Store on Lulu. Jeff's Store has some of the texts offered on this website, and several other historic texts, not on the website. They are offered as reprints.

CALENDAR

1899-1900
Date Activity
Thursday, September 28th The Sixty-second Session Opens
Tuesday, October 3rd Lectures Begin, the intervening days being devoted to Preliminary Entrance Examinations
Monday, October 16th Fall Examination Begin
Thursday, October 26th Thanksgiving Day Holiday
Saturday, Decemebr 23rd Christmas Holidays Begin
Tuesday, January 2nd Lectures are Resumed
Saturday, April 7th Lectures for the Session End
Monday, April 9th Final Examinations Begin
Thursday, May 3rd Final Examination End
Thursday, May 10th Commencement Day
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Medical College of Virginia

Board of Visitors
Name Residence
J. B. McCaw, M.D., President
Daniel W. Lassiter, M.D. Petersburg
Rev. J. J. Lafferty, D. D. Richmond City
R. E. Moore, M. D. Wytheville
James B. McCaw< M. D., Richmond City
George B. Harrison, Esq. Boyce
W. W. Douglas, M. D. Warsaw
Herbert M. Nash, M. D. Norfolk
J. S. Pendleton, M.D., Scottsville
John B. Purcell, Esq. Richmond City
Wyndham R. Meredith, Esq. Richmond City
Thos. H. Barnes, M.D. Elwood
Thomas P. Mathews, M. D., Manchester
J. F. Bryant, M. D., Franklin
Bev. T. Crump, Esq. Richmond City
Jos. N. Barney, Jr., M.D. Fredericksburg
John S. Harwood, Esq. Richmond City
N. H. Massie, Esq Danville
P. Thornton Marye Newport News
John Crawford, M. D. Yale
Daniel D. Talley, Secretary Richmond City
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A part of the Dissecting Hall

Medicine

Faculty

Christopher Tompkins, M. D., Dean of the Faculty and Emeritus Professor of Obstetrics
John S. Wellford, M.D., Emeritus Professor of Diseases of Women and Children
M. L. James, M. D., Emeritus Professor of Practice of Medicine; Special Lecturer on Diseases of the Heart and Lungs
J. W. Long, M. D., Emeritus Professor of Diseases of Women and Children
John N. Upshur, M. D., Emeritus Professor of Practice of Medicine
Wm. H. Taylor, M. D., Professor of Chemistry, Toxicology and Medical Jurisprudence
Henry H. Levy, M. D., Professor of Practice of Medicine
Geo. Ben. Johnston, M. D., Professor of Gynecology and Abdominal Surgery
Lewis C. Bosher, M. D., Professor of Surgery
J. Page Massie, M. D., Professor of Obstetrics and Diseases of the Puerperal State, and Lecuturer on Nervous Diseases.
C. A. Blanton, M. D., Professor of Diseases of Children
Wm. P. Mathews, M. D., Professor of General and Special Anatomy, and Clinical Lecturer on Orthopedic Surgery
Ernest C. Levy, M. D., Professor of Histology, Pathology, and Bacteriology
Ro. F. Williams, M. D., Professor of Materia Medica and Theraputics
John P. Davidson, M. D., Professor of Diseases of the Eye, Ear, and Throat
Charles M. Hazen, M. D., Professor of Physiology and Lecturer on Hygiene

ADJUNCT FACULTY

Wm. Augustus Lee, M. D., Demonstrator of Obstetrics
J. M. Whitfield, M. D., Lecturer on Organic Chemistry and Demonstrator of Chemistry
D. A. Kuyk, M. D., Lecturer on Laryngology and Instructor in the Diseases of the Eye, Ear, and Throat
Clifton M. Miller, M. D., Demonstrator of Anatomy and Curator of the Museum
F. H. Beadles, M. D., Lecturer on Diseases of the Skin
Charles R. Robins, M. D., Instructor in Gynecology and Abdominal Surgery
R. B. Teusler, M. D., Demonstrator of Pathology of Medicine
Ramon D. Garcin, M. D., Instructor in Medical Jurisprudence
W. S. Beazley, M. D., Instructor in Medical Jurisprudence
Wm. J. West, M. D., Instructor in Diseases of the Nervous System
D. Meade Mann, M. D., Lecturer on Minor Surgery and Instructor in Surgery
Daniel J. Coleman, M. D., Instructor in Obstetrics and Diseases of the Puerperal State.
W. H. Lyne, M. D., Demonstrator of Operative Surgery and Normal Histology
A. B. Greiner, M. D., Instructor in Materia Medica and Theraputics
Wm. A. McGowan, M. D., Instructor in Orthopedic Surgery
B. L. Talliaferro, M. D., Instructor in Physiology
B. W. Rawles, M.D., Instructor in Diseases of Children
J. Fulmer, Bright, M.D., Instructor in Anatomy and Assistant Demonstrator of Anatomy

VIRGINIA SCHOOL OF DENTISTRY

FACULTY

Henry C. Jones, D. D. S., Professor of Operative and Clinical Dentistry
Edwin P. Wright, D. D. S., Professor of Prostthetic Dentistry
Wm. H. Taylor, M. D., Professor of Chemistry and Metallurgy
Charles M. Hazen, M. D., Professor of Physiology
Wm. P. Mathews, M. D., Professor of Anatomy
E. C. Levy, M. D., Professor of Histology, Pathology and Bacteriology
Ro. F. Williams, M.D., Professor of Materia Medica and Theraputics
Richard C. Walden, D. D. S., Acting Professor of Dentistry, Oral Surgery, and Special Anatomy of the Head, and Instructor in Crown and Bridge Work

VIRGINIA SCHOOL OF PHARMACY

FACULTY

Frank M. Reade, M. D., Professor of Theory and Practice of Pharmacy
J. M. Whitfield, M. D., Professor of Organic and Analytical Chemistry
Wm. H. Taylor, M. D., Professor of General and Inorganic Chemistry and Toxicology
Ro. F. Williams, M. D., Professor of Materia Medica.
F. H. Beadles, M. D., Professor of Botany and Parmacognosy

Daniel D. Talley, College Secretary
William T. Ford, College Janitor

DISPENSARY STAFF

F. M. Beadles, M. D., Superintendent
J. G. Loving, M. D., Practice of Medicine
Prof. H. H. Levy, M.D., Consulting Physician
Wm. A. McGowan, M. D., Gynecology and Abdominal Surgery
Prof. Geo. Ben. Johnston, M. D., Consulting Gynecologist
B. W. Rawles, M.D., Diseases of Children
Prof. Chas. A. Blanton, M. D., Consulting Physician
Clifton M. Miller, M. D., Obstetrics
Prof. Christopher Tomkins, M. D., and Prof. J. Page Massie, M.D., Consulting Obstetricians
J. A. Keck, M. D., Genito-Urinary and Veneral Diseases
Prof. Lewis C. Bosher, M. D., Consulting Surgeon
J. Richard Williams, M. D., Surgery
Prof. Lewis C. Bosher, M. D., Consulting Surgeon
W. J. West, M. D., Diseases of the Nervous System
Prof. J. Page Massie, M. D., Consulting Neurologist
D. A. Kuyk, M. D., Diseases of the Eye, Ear, Throat, and Nose
Prof. John P. Davidson, M. D., Consulting Ocultist and Aurist
F. H. Beadles, M. D., Diseases of the Skin
Prof. E. C. Levy, M.D., Pathologist and Bacteriologist
Prof. Wm. H. Taylor, M. D., Consulting Chemist
Henry G. Latimer, Ph.G., Pharmacist

Staff of Outside Obstetrical Service

Attending Obstetricians

W. Augustus Lee, M. D.
Charles R. Robins, M. D.
Clifton M. Miller, M.D.
Daniel J. Coleman, M.D.
Ramon D. Garcin, M. D.

Consulting Obstetricians

Prof. Christopher Tompkins, M. D.
Prof. J. Page Massie, M.D.

MATRICULATES

1899-1900
NAME RESIDENCE NAME RESIDENCE
Adams, W. C. Virginia Albert, C. W. W. Virginia
Anderson, M. L. Virginia Andrews, C. J. New York
Anglin, J. T. Virginia Atkinson, H. D. Virginia
Baker, B. New York Blanton, J. C. Virginia
Bailey, C. L. Virginia Benton, G. R. North Carolina
Briggs, L. V. New Hampshire Bowne, T. A. Virginia
Brown, Benj. Jr., Virginia Brown, Ro. C. South Carolina
Brown, Ro. S. Jr., Virginia Bossieux, Eugene Virginia
Bowier, J. W. Virginia Burwell, C. A. Virginia
Buchanan, A. E. Virginia Call, Manfred Virginia
Caldwell, B. R. Virginia Caldwell, J. K. Virginia
Chase, F. C. Florida Campbell, M. Virginia
Carter, O. N. Virginia Chinn, W. N. Virginia
Coleman, H. R., M.D. Virginia Cooke, W. L. Virginia
Cosby, L. T. Virginia Cowper, C. W., (Pharmacy) Virginia
Cowper, C. W. (Medicine) Virginia Cunningham, F. M. Virginia
Draper, S. A. Virginia DeBordenave, E. A. Virginia
DeShazo, J. N. Virginia DeVaney, C. L. Virginia
Dickerson, L. C. Virginia Doughtie, C. W., M.D. Virginia
Easley, E. M. W. Virginia Elliott, S. T. Virginia
Eisenman, F. J. New York Edmond, Marion Virginia
Fairfax, H. R., M.D. Virginia Ferrebee, C. G. North Carolina
Ferry, E. L. W. Virginia Flegenheimer, Wm., Jr. Virginia
Fisher, C. H. Virginia Foster, W. B. Virginia
Fagg, R. P., M.D. Virginia Gwathmey, Wm., M. D. Virginia
Green, A. L. Virginia Gregory, J. C., Jr. Virginia
Gills, W. A. Virginia Ginn, T. L. North Carolina
Gwin, J. M. W. Virginia Glover, Perkins Virginia
Goodman, H. L. Virginia Goodman, Ro. S. Virginia
Greiner, A. B. M.D. Virginia Gunn, Henry L. Virginia
Hagey, J. H. Virginia Hammer, Virgil Virginia
Hankins, Jno. L., (Pharmacy) Virginia Hankins, Jno. L., (Medicine) Virginia
Hargrave, E. T. Virginia Harris, Jno. E. Virginia
Harris, T. C. Virginia Harris, W. A. Virginia
Hart, Jas. O. Virginia Hart, S. F. Virginia
Hatchett, E. A. Virginia Harwood, Ashton Virginia
Hayes, E. H. Virginia Holloway, O. W. North Carolina
Holley, Ro. W. Virginia Holt., Russell D. Virginia
Hooks, Thel North Carolina Hord, B. A., M.D. Virginia
Hudnall, B.R. Virginia Hume, B. L. Virginia
Hunter, H. H. North Carolina Hunter, W. L. W. Virginia
Jackson, Jno. T. Virginia Jacob, T. N. Virginia
Jennings, W. K. Virginia Jordan, J. Woode Virginia
Jordan, S. R. Virginia Jones, J. W. C. Virginia
Keller, W. L. New York Kelly, J. F. Virginia
Kernan, Paul Virginia Knight, J. H. North Carolina
Landon, G. S. Virginia Latimer, H. G. Virginia
Lankford, J. W. Virginia Lawrence, E. L. Virginia
Lillard, E. N. Virginia Lonas, J. B. Virginia
Loving, J. G. Virginia McCoy, W. K. Virginia
McCue, J. D. W. Virginia McNair, R. T. North Carolina
Mahood, H. S. Virginia Marston, W. A. Virginia
Martin, E. R. Virginia Mason, W. B. Virginia
Maxwell, C. S. North Carolina Miller, J. J., M.D. Virginia
Monk, H. L. North Carolina Mosby, Ernest Virginia
Mullins, Ira Virginia O'Brien, Jno. Jr. Virginia
Osborn, A. J. Virginia Owen, B. A. Virginia
Painter, W. G. Virginia Parker, S. F. North Carolina
Patton, H. W. Virginia Pilkington, A. England
Powell, W. C. Virginia Purdy, J. J. Virginia
Quincy, F. B. New Jersey Ragland, J. F., Jr. Virginia
Reade, F. M. Virginia Rex, J. P. Virginia
Rice, B. A. Virginia Rucker, Carl Virginia
Shackelford, E. W. Virginia Sandberg, E. T. Sweden
Sanders, D. M. Virginia Sandidge, E. M. Virginia
Sandidge, Edward Virginia Sparks, Geo. H. Virginia
Staley, T. F. Virginia Sauls, M. M. North Carolina.
Shepherd, H. A. Virginia Shepherd, W. S. Virginia
Stith, W. M. Virginia Shipp, J. B. Virginia
Scott, R. H Virginia Solliday, D. S. Virginia
Stubbs, S. M. Virginia Sutton, A. B. Virginia
Talbot, Ro. S. Virginia Taliaferro. B. L., M.d. Virginia.
Tatum, B. F. Virginia. Taylor, J. N. North Carolina.
Terrell, E. H. Virginia. Tilman, J. E. Virginia.
Thornhill, W. A. Virginia. Troy, T. S. North Carolina.
Tutwiler. H. L. Virginia. Vest, W. W. Virginia
Waggoner, J. A. Virginia. Wallace, W. H. New York.
Ward, F. A. North Carolina. Warren, H. B. Virginia.
Watts, Chas. N. Virginia. Weaver, Z. L. Virginia.
West, R. M. North Carolina. White, Jno. F. Virginia.
White, T. W. Virginia. White, Rev. R. H. Virginia.
Whitiehuest, P. B. Virginia. Whited, E. P. Virginia.
Williams, Geo. E. Virginia. Williams, I. Howard. Virginia.
Williams, J. R., M. D. Virginia. Williams, R. F Virginia.
Wilson, S. J. Virginia. Wright, L. T. Virginia.
Yancey, W. D. Virginia.

GRADUATES IN MEDICINE

At the Annual Commencement held on May 4th, 1899, the degree of Doctor of Medicine was conferred on the following graduates;

1899-1900
NAME RESIDENCE
BRIGGS, L. VERNON Hanover, N. H.
BROWN, BENJ., Jr. Amherst, Va.
CALL, MANFRED Richmond, Va.
CALDWELL, JOHN K. Old Town, Va.
CUNNINGHAM, FRANK M. Richmond, Va.
DEBOEDENAVE, E. A. Franklin, Va.
GOODMAN, Ro. S Palmyra, Va.
GIINN, HENRY L South Boston, Va.
HOLLEY, ROBERT W Medota, Va.
HOLT, RUSSELL D Goldsboro, N. C.
HUDNALL, B. R. Lilian, Va.
JACOB, THOMAS N Cape Charles, Va.
JORDAN, S. R. Republican Grove, Va.
KELLER, WM. L. New York City
LOVING, J. GARLAND, Manchester, Va.
MAHOOD, HUGH B Petersburg, Va.
MARTIN, ERNEST R Palmyra, Va.
MASON, WM. BEVERLEY Marshall, Va.
MONK, H. L Newton Grove, N. C.
MOSBY, ERNEST Chestnut Grove, Va.
OSBORN, ANDREW J Lawrenceville, Va.
READE, FRANK M Richmond, Va.
SANDERS, DAN. M Chilhowie, Va.
TROY, THAD. S Durham, N. C.
WALLACE, W. H. New York City
WARD, F. A. Gilden, N. C.

GRADUATES IN PHARMACY

1899-1900
NAME RESIDENCE
BOWEN, TURNER A Newport News, Va.
LATIMER, HENRY G Richmond, Va.
OWEN, B. A. Newport News, Va.

HOSPITAL APPOINTMENTS.

At the close of the last session the following graduates were appointed to the several institutions named below:

Old Dominion Hospital, Richmond, Dr. Manfred Call and Dr. S. R. Jordan
City Almshouse Hospital, Richmond, Dr. Frank M. Cunnigham.
Retreat for the Sick, Richmond, Dr. Ben. Brown, Jr.
Sheltering Arms Hospital. Richmond, Dr. T. N. Jacob. St. Vincent's Hospital, Norfolk, Va., Dr. E. C. S. Taliaferro
Norfolk Protestant Hospital, Norfolk, Va., Dr. H. B .Mahood and Dr. E. A. DeBordennave
United States Marine Hospital. Boston, Mass., Dr. Ernest Mosby and DR. H. R. Fairfax
United States Marine Hospital, Chicago, Ill, Dr. Wm. L. Keller

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Laboratory Building

ANNOUNCEMENT,

Session 1899-1900.

THE MEDICAL COLLEGE OF VIRGINIA, situated at Richmond, a city of 100,000 inhabitants, with adjoining towns which increase the available population to about 140,000, offers to the student instruction by teachers of many years of continued experience with unlimited means of illustration at their command.

The efficiency of the instruction in this School has been demonstrated by the high standing of its graduates before Examining Boards of the Army, Navy, and Marine Hospital Service, in competitive examinations, and before various State Boards, as well as by the selection of its alumni to be professors in other Medical Schools.

In order to keep the School fully abreast with the times in regard to modern methods of teaching, the course has been extended to cover four years. This College was the first Medical School in the State to adopt this advance.

The College is a member in good standing of the Southern Medical College Association.

In order to still further extend the range of its professional instruction, the College has established a School of Dentistry and a School of Pharmacy. In another part of this Announcement will be found an account of these two important departments.

EQUIPMENT.

The main College Building contains three large and commodious lecture balls; a new dissecting-hall, with the most modern appointments; a physiological laboratory; a hygienic laboratory; a library and reading room well stocked with books and medical periodicals; together with rooms devoted to the executive work of the College. Adjoining the main building is the new Laboratory Building, recently erected to meet the requirements of a constantly increasing number of students, and specially planned for laboratory purposes. Attached to the College is the Old Dominion Hospital, which is fully equipped after the newest and most approved plans governing sanitation and comfort.

GENERAL PLAN OF INSTRUCTION.

Instruction is given in a four years' graded course which comprises didactic lectures, with demonstrations, clinical teaching, recitations, examinations, and practical work in well-equipped laboratories.

LECTURES.

Complete courses of lectures, appropriately illustrated by drawings, models and demonstrations, are given during the collegiate year on the following subjects: Anatomy, Physiology, Embryology, Chemistry, Toxicology, Materia Medica, Therapeutics, Histology, Pathology, Bacteriology, Practice of Medicine, Principles and Practice of Surgery, Abdominal Surgery, Genito-Urinary Surgery and Venereal Diseases, Obstetrics, Diseases of Women, Diseases of Children, Diseases of the Eye, Ear and Throat, Diseases of the Nervous System, Diseases of the Skin, Hygiene, Medical Jurisprudence, Electrotherapeutics and History of Medicine.

LABORATORY INSTRUCTION.

A prominent position in the Curriculum is accorded to practical work in the laboratories, as follows:

Anatomical Laboratory.-During the past year the Faculty has constructed a new Dissecting-Hall after the most approved modern plans with regard to lighting and ventilation. Here the study of practical anatomy is pursued in daily dissections, and every convenience is afforded for cleanliness and comfort in the work.

Physiological Laboratory.-This Laboratory has been equipped with all the necessary apparatus for demonstration of the various processes of the human organism and the chemical changes incident to the functions of the normal body.

Hygiene Laboratory.-The advances in preventive medicine have brought Hygiene into a degree of prominence, which requires practical study in the important investigations relating to the purity of air, water, food stuffs, etc., for which purpose this Laboratory has been arranged.

Chemical Laboratory--This large and commodious Laboratory is situated in the new Laboratory Building, the second story of which is devoted to its use. Here, with every appliance necessary for the pursuit of chemical investigation, the student has the means of perfecting himself in this branch of science.

Histological, Pathological and Bacteriological Laboratory--This Laboratory occupies the third story of the new Laboratory Building, and is plentifully equipped with fine microscopes, and all other apparatus necessary for the pursuit of the study of these branches. A well stocked animal room in connection with this Laboratory and a large collection of pathological specimens render instruction in this department thorough and comprehensive.

Surgical Laboratory--Thorough instruction is here given by operations on the cadaver in the technique of all the important surgical procedures.

CLINICAL INSTRUCTION.

Clinical instruction is fully recognized as an indispensable factor in teaching the art and science of medicine, and the Faculty is able to supply it in abundance, utilizing for this purpose the material furnished by the different public charities and asylums of the city, State and municipal, as well as that afforded by the Old Dominion Hospital, its annex and the City Dispensary.

During the past session almost every kind of surgical operation was performed in the amphitheater of the Old Dominion Hospital in the presence of the class, in addition to daily clinics held in the Departments of Practice of Medicine, Diseases of Children, Orthopedic Surgery, Diseases of the Eye, Ear and Throat, General Surgery and Venereal Diseases, Abdominal Surgery and Diseases of Women, Diseases of the Skin, and Diseases of the Nervous System. The Faculty will in the future be able to provide ample Obstetrical clinics in the Maternity Hospital, which occupies a large and commodious building adjoining the Old Dominion Hospital, and which has been thoroughly equipped for obstetrical purposes.

The City Dispensary, which occupies the first story of the new Laboratory Building, is well arranged for the treatment of out-door patients, and comprises the following departments:

  1. Department of Practice of Medicine.
  2. Department of General Surgery and Genito-Urinary Diseases.
  3. Department of Diseases of Women and Abdominal Surgery.
  4. Department of Obstetrics.
  5. Department of Diseases of Children.
  6. Department of Diseases of the Eye, Ear and Throat.
  7. Department of Diseases of the Nervous System.
  8. Department of Diseases of the Skin.

Thousands of patients attend this institution annually, and are treated for every form and variety of diseases. Its facilities for the management, treatment and care of these patients are fully equal to those offered by the best medical colleges of this country.

A special feature of clinical instruction which will be inaugurated during the coming session will be the use of this Dispensary for sectional clinics, in which, by instruction to small groups of students, every facility will be given for the observation of patients and for the demonstration of methods of physical diagnosis.

These departments are under the care of the physicians and surgeons whose names will be found elsewhere under the head of "Dispensary Staff."

Special clinics in Diseases of the Heart and Lungs are held at the City Almshouse and State Penitentiary.

RECITATIONS.

Supplementary to the regular lectures by the Professors, recitations are held weekly by the Instructors upon the preceding lectures, and monthly by the Professors.

CURRICULUM.

The Curriculum consists of a four years' graded course, and the student, taking up in his first year only the elementary branches, is enabled to lay a solid foundation, upon which his subsequent education may be advantageously constructed. Examinations in each course will be held at the end of the session on all subjects taught during the year. After the session of 1899-1900 only those students will he allowed to enter the advanced courses who have made seventy-five per cent. of the previous course.

The studies are arranged for a four years' course, as follows:

FIRST YEAR.

Anatomy.-Two lectures a week. Dissecting, eight hours a week.
Physiology.-One lecture a week. Physiological Laboratory, two hours a week.
Inorganic Chemistry and Toxicology.~Two lectures a week. Chemical Laboratory, four hours a week.
Materia Medica.-One lecture a week.
Normal Histology.~One lecture a week. Laboratory, two hours a week.
Embryology.--One lecture a week. Laboratory, two hours a week.

SECOND YEAR.

Anatomy.--One lecture a week. Dissecting, four hours a week.
Physiology.~Two lectures a week. Physiological Laboratory, two hours a week.
Organic Chemistry and Toxicology. -Two lectures a week. Laboratory, four hours a week.
Materia Medica.-One lecture a week.
Principles of Surgery.-One lecture a week.
Obstetrics.-One lecture a week.
Bacteriology.-Two lectures a week. Bacteriological Laboratory, four hours a week.

THIRD YEAR.

Therapeutics.~Two lectures a week.
Practice of Medicine.-One lecture a week. Clinic, one hour a week.
Genito-Urinary Surgery and Venereal Diseases.--One lecture a week. Clinic, one hour a week.
Obstetrics.-One lecture a week.
Minor Gynecology.--One lecture a week.
Diseases of Children.--One lecture a week. Clinic, one hour a week.
Pathology.-Two lectures a week. Pathological Laboratory, four hours a week.
Medical Jurisprudence and Special Toxicology.--One lecture a week.
Hygiene.-One lecture a week. Laboratory, two hours a week.
Minor Surgery and Operative Surgery. Two hours a week.
Laryngology.--One lecture a week.
General Clinics.-Six hours a week.

FOURTH YEAR.

Practice of Medicine.--Two lectures a week. Clinic, one hour a week.
Practice of Surgery.-One lecture a week. Clinic, one hour a week.
Orthopedic Surgery.--Clinic, one hour a week.
Gynecology and Abdominal Surgery.--One lecture a week. Clinic, one hour a week.
Diseases Of the Eye, Ear, and Throat.-Two lectures a week. Clinic, one hour a week.
Diseases of the Nervous System.-One lecture a week.
Diseases of the Skin.-One lecture a week.
Diseases of Children.-One lecture a week. Clinic, one hour a week.
Electrotherapeutics.-One lecture a week for half session.
History of Medicine.-One lecture a week for half session.
Sectional Clinics.-Six hours a week.

DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION.

CHEMISTRY, TOXICOLOGY, AND MEDICAL JURISPRUDENCE.
PROF. WILLLAM H. TAYLOR, M. D.
J. M. WHITFIELD, M. D.. Lecturer on Organic Chemistry and Toxicology, and Demonstrator of Chemistry
W. S. BEAZLEY, M.D., Instructor in Medical Jurisprudence

Chemistry is taught in this College with special reference to its relations to practical Medicine. Particular attention is bestowed upon such matters as the detection of impurities in medicines, securing compatibility in prescriptions, testing for poisons and treatment of poisoning, examination of urine, and Physiological and Pathological Chemistry. As a knowledge of the principles of the sciences is all important, these are fully explained, and in a manner which is adapted to the comprehension of the beginner in the study. The Laboratory Course is conducted on an extended plan. Each student is furnished with a working-table, and will be required to do practical chemical work. There is no additional charge for the Laboratory Course.

The general principles of Toxicology and its special applications are clearly explained, and full consideration is given to the many other important subjects belonging to Medical Jurisprudence.

PRACTICE OF MEDICINE.

PROP. H. H. Levy, M. D.
RAMON D. GARCIN, M. D, Instructor.

This branch is to be taught, in accordance with the principles of a graded course, in two systematic, separate series of didactic lectures with ample clinical illustration.

The students will be thoroughly instructed in the most approved methods of examining patients with a view to making correct diagnoses, and throughout the two years' course of study every effort will be made and opportunity sought to give each member of the class direct and careful clinical instruction.

GYNECOLOGY AND ABDOMINAL SURGERY.

PROF. GEO. BEN. JOHNSTON, M.D.
CHAS. R. ROBINS, M. D., Instructor.

The instruction in these branches is thorough and practical, comprising a systematic course of didactic lectures illustrated by operations performed before the class. These operations are very numerous and of every kind, the Old Dominion Hospital, the City Free Dispensary, and other institutions, furnishing excellent opportunity therefor.

SURGERY.

PROF. LEWIS C. BOSHER, M. D.
D. MEADE MANN, M. D, Instructor
W. H. LYNN, M.D. Instructor

Instruction in this course will cover three years. Beginning with the second year Principles of Surgery will be taught in weekly didactic lectures supplemented by systematic examinations. In the third year the study of Genito-Urinary Surgery and Venereal Diseases will be taken up and taught in weekly lectures liberally Illustrated by appropriate plates, charts arid diagrams, and all other accessories helpful to a perfect comprehension of the subject. Practice of Surgery will be taught in the fourth year. In addition to weekly lectures the student will have constant as well as abundant opportunity on the clinical days to witness the performance of a great variety of surgical operations, and if observing the practical application to injuries and diseases of those principles of the art which he has heard taught in lectures.

The student will be practically taught by the Demonstrator of Surgery in the Laboratory of Operative Surgery how to prepare for and perform all of the operations of Surgery.

The Instructors of Surgery will teach the highly important branch of Minor Surgery in all of its practical details.

Genito-Urinary and Venereal Diseases are treated daily in large numbers at the College Dispensary, where, by reason of its proximity to the lecture-room, the student has them constantly under his observation.

OBSTETRICS AND DISEASES Or THE PUERPERAL STATE.

PROF. J. PACE MASSIR, M. D.
WM. AUGUSTUS LEE, M. D., Demonstrator.
DANIEL J. COLEMAN, M. D., Instructor

In this department a complete course of lectures is delivered, in which the principles of Modern Obstetrics are thoroughly taught. Free use of models and drawings is made in the illustration of lectures. The demonstrator of this branch divides the class into sections, and thoroughly drills each section in the mechanism of labor by means of the manikin. Within the past year the College has organized and now has in operation a well-equipped Obstetrical Hospital known as "The Maternity Hospital," thus adding greatly to the facilities heretofore offered in the teaching of Practical and Clinical Obstetrics. This is the only hospital of its kind in the State. In connection with the Maternity Hospital is operated an "Outside Obstetric Service," the object of which is to furnish skilled obstetrical attendance to indigent women at their homes. Members of the graduating class are allowed to attend in turn these confinement cases in company with the attending physician, and to assist in delivery.

 

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A Part of the Bacteriological Laboratory

DISEASES or CHILDREN.

PROF. C. A. BLANTON, M.D.
B. W. RAWLES, M. D., Instructor

In this important branch every effort will be made, by means of a systematic course of didactic lectures and recitations, to render the instruction clear, practical, and thorough. The fundamental principles of Infant Feeding and Hygiene will receive a large share of attention. Prominence will be given to the latest accepted teachings in Bacteriology. The peculiarities of diseases as they occur in children will be pointed out and dwelt upon. The Dispensary connected with the College, and other charitable institutions, afford ample clinical material for this department.

GENERAL AND SPECIAL ANATOMY.

PROF. WILLIAM P. MATHEWS, M. D.
J. FULMER BRIGHT, M. D., Instructor in Anatomy and Assistant Demonstrator of Anatomy.

The College Museum is amply supplied with elaborate models, new plates, drawings, and elegant preparations, and these will be used to illustrate the lectures on Anatomy. Practical demonstrations will be made before the class upon fresh dissections of the cadaver.

First-course students will be required at the end of the first year to stand an examination on Osteology, Arthrology and Myology. At the close of the second year second-course students will be permitted to come up for the final examination in Anatomy, provided they have completed the required two years' course in dissection under the Ekemonstrator of Anatomy.

PRACTICAL ANATOMY.

CLIFTON M. MILLER, M. D., Demonstrator.

This department will be under the charge of the Demonstrator, who will give the student every aid in this important branch by demonstrations and lectures. There is no additional charge for anatomical material.

HISTOLOGY, PATHOLOGY, AND BACTERIOLOGY,

PROF. E. C. LEVY, M.D.
R. B. TEUSLER, M. D., Demonstrators and Instructors.
WM. H. LYNE. M. D.

New and thoroughly equipped laboratories offer unsurpassed facilities for the practical teaching of these branches.

Normal Histology is taught during the first year by lectures and practical work in the preparation and microscopic examination of the chief organs and tissues of the body.

Bacteriology is taken up during the second year. After lectures upon technique the student is enabled to put his theoretical knowledge into practice by work upon the non-pathogenic micro-organisms, after which the pathogenic ones are dealt with. Special attention is paid to the practical bearings of Bacteriology upon the diagnosis and treatment of disease. When necessary, animal experiments are performed to illustrate the action of pathogenic bacteria.

Pathology is taught during the third year. The College Museum contains specimens of many rare pathological conditions, while frequent necropsies enable the student to familiarize himself with the gross lesions of disease. The Laboratory is supplied with an excellent collection of diseased organs and tissues which are used for sectioning and distributing to the class, each member of which is required to prepare and mount specimens of the chief pathological conditions arising in the human subject. There is no additional charge for material used in this course.

MATERIA MEDICA AND THERAPEUTICS.

PROF. ROBERT P. WILLIAMS, M. D.
A. H. GREINER, M. D., Instructor.

Instruction in this department is given by didactic lectures, recitations and demonstrations, and covers three years. The first year's course embraces a study of the principles of Prescription Writing, the modes of combining and administering drugs, and a description of the individual drugs, their properties, preparations and dosage. A large cabinet of crude drugs and medicinal preparations attached to this department affords ample illustration of this part of the course, and affords the student an opportunity to familiarize himself with the characteristics of the drugs considered in the lectures.

In the second year the study of the Physiological action of the individual drugs is pursued, together with a consideration of the poisons and their antidotes, and the incompatibilities. In this course the student is thoroughly drilled in writing prescriptions for special effects in the combination of drugs.

The work of the third year in this department is devoted to Therapeutics, and includes, besides a study of the application of drugs to the relief and cure of disease, a consideration of the principles of the important remedial agents, Dietetics, Massage, and Hydrotherapy. In this course the student is further exercised in writing prescriptions to meet special therapeutic indications.

DISEASES OF THE EYE, EAR, AND THROAT.

PROF. JOHN P. DAVIDSON, M. D.
D. A. KUYK, M. D., Instructor.

In this department sufficient time will be utilized to enable the student to acquire such special knowledge of the anatomy and physiology of the eye and ear as will aid him in the comprehension of diseased conditions of these organs. Special consideration will given to those diseased conditions of the eye and ear which the general practitioner is called upon to treat.

The relations which diseases of the eye bear to constitutional conditions, particularly those complicating nervous disorders, both functional and organic, will be discussed as far as possible.

The instruction in diseases of the ear will be extensive, and will include the brain complications that frequently accompany purulent otic processes.

Ample consideration will he given to the important subject of nasal diseases as well as to nasal surgery, so as to afford the student opportunities to acquaint himself with abnormal conditions of the nose.

In the department of Laryngology clinical as well as didactic instruction will be given. The student will be taught the use of the laryngoscope; also the method of intuition and all other operative procedures in and about the larynx, the free Dispensary connected with the College furnishing material for this and all other clinics. Each student will be taught to manipulate all the instruments used in operations on the Eye, Ear, and Throat.

PHYSIOLOGY

Prof. CHAS. M. HAZEN, M.D.
B. L. TALIAFERRO, M.D., Instructor

Physiology is begun in the first year and finished in the second, and is taught by lectures, examinations, demonstrations, and laboratory work.

The first year's work is elementary. It embraces an outline study of Physiology, a review of General Physics (leading to the study of Physiological Physics), introductory work in Physiological Chemistry and Experimental Physiology.

In the second year there is given a full course of lectures and demonstrations in the field of General Physiology, including Physiological Physics and Chemistry, and laboratory work in Physiological Chemistry and Experimental Physiology.

DISEASES OF THE NERVOUS SYSTEM.

PROF. J. PAGE MASSIF, M. D., Clinical Lecturer.

In this department will be given combined didactic and clinical teaching. The Old Dominion Hospital, attached to the College, the City Free Dispensary, and other institutions, furnish abundant material for illustrating lectures.

DISEASES OF THE HEART AND LUNGS.

PROF. M. L. JAMES, M.D., Clinical Lecturer.

The consideration of Cardiac and Pulmonary Diseases will be made as comprehensive as possible, and their special pathology presented with abundant clinical illustration.

DISEASES OF THE SKIN.

F. H. BEADLES, M. D., Lecturer.

Clinical and didactic lectures will be delivered on this subject, the chief object of which will be to thoroughly familiarize the student with those diseases of the skin daily encountered by every practicing physician. To further this object, clinics for the Illustration of each subject will be procured from the Department of Diseases of the Skin in the City Dispensary, where a large number of cases are treated daily.

ORTHOPEDIC SURGERY.

PROF. WM. P. MATHEWS, M. D., Clinical Lecturer.

This department will be conducted by weekly clinics, cases for illustration being procurable from the Old Dominion Hospital and other clinical institutions under the control of the Faculty.

HYGIENC.

PROF. CHARLES. M. HAZER, M. D., Lecturer.

The importance of this subject has led to an enlargement of its scope, which will include, besides the usual didactic lectures, an ample course in laboratory work, in which the practical relations of the science will be specially regarded.

SCHEDULE OF EXAMINATIONS

[Omitted from this online edition]

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The Operating Ampitheatre

ADMISSION AND REQUIREMENTS.

  1. No student applying for matriculation will be admitted if, in the opinion of the Faculty, his preliminary education is not sufficient to justify his entering qn the study of medicine. He must, therefore, present evidence that he is a graduate of a college or high school, or of some other literary institution of approved standing; or else he must pass an examination, to be conducted under the supervision of the Faculty, equivalent to that which is required of an applicant for a first-grade teacher's certificate-namely, in Spelling, Writing, School Arithmetic, Practical Grammar, Ordinary School Geography, and History of the United States.
  2. Students who have attended one regular course in a medical college of good standing will be advanced as students of the second year on presentation of tickets showing such attendance.
  3. Students coming after two years of study in other medical colleges in good standing may be examined upon the subjects of Anatomy, Physiology, Chemistry, Toxicology, Materia Medica, Histology, and Bacteriology at the beginning of the term.
  4. The candidate for the degree of Doctor of Medicine must have attended four full courses of medical lectures, each in a separate year, the last course, at least, of whicli must have been delivered in this College.
  5. He must have dissected all parts of a subject during two sessions at this College or at some other institution, which fact must be certified to by the Demonstrator of Anatomy of the institution where such dissection was made.
  6. He must have passed a satisfactory examination on all the branches taught in the Medical Department of this College.
  7. Should he fail on any primary branch, he will be entitled to stand another examination at the beginning of the next session, not later than November 1st.
  8. He must deliver to the Dean, on or before the first day of March, the fee for the examination for the degree.
  9. The examination fee of a rejected candidate will be retained, but no additional fee will be charged for any future examination.
  10. A candidate rejected at the final examination will not be reexamined until after attending another course of lectures.
  11. The degree will not be conferred upon a candidate who absents himself from the Commencement without the permission of the Faculty.
  12. When the candidate shall have complied with the foregoing requirements, and there are no opposing moral or intellectual reasons, he will be entitled to the degree of Doctor of Medicine.
  13. Students will be held responsible for any loss or damage they may inflict on College property.
  14. The Faculty reserves the right to terminate the connection of a student with the College for what, in the opinion of the Faculty, is on his part inexcusably had conduct, or other disqualification.

(The Faculty has, at the request of the students, abolished the time-honored custom of bestowing prizes.)

STATE STUDENTS.

The Faculty of the Medical College of Virginia, in evidence of its appreciation of the annual appropriation made by the State for the maintenance of this institution, has determined to receive and educate, free of all charges save Matriculation and Diploma fees, ten students, to be appointed in the following manner: The Senators have been arranged in groups of four, and will bd invited to select a student, and should said Senators agree on one student he will be received, provided his preliminary education and moral qualifications are such as accord with the requirements for Matriculation. In the event that there is more than one nomination, there must be a competitive examination, and the appointment will be given to the student who, in this competition, secures the highest standing, said examination to be of such a kind as is commonly required of a first-grade teacher of a public school. Should a student, for any reason, not continue his studies at the Medical College of Virginia, or graduates and receives his Diploma, then the four Senators from whose district said student was received will be invited to fill his place in the manner above designated.

FEES.

The Medical College of Virginia on and after January 1, 1899, required of its medical students four years' study before they could apply for graduation. It was determined that this advance in medical education should be in no sense a hardship to matriculants, and the College being a State institution and receiving an appropriation from the Commonwealth, the Faculty has therefore reduced the fees for medical tuition from $90 to $65 per session. Thus it will be seen that at this school students will have the advantage of a most approved course of medical education at no greater cost than heretofore. This sum of $65 includes the fees for Matriculation, Lectures, Regular Examinations, Clinics, Demonstrations in Anatomy, Chemistry, and all other branches, embracing Laboratory Work and Anatomical Material.

The examination fee for the degree of Doctor of Medicine (paid only once) is $30.

No reduction from the above fees will be made. All fees are payable in advance.

Students who have paid their fees for four regular sessions in the Medical Department are allowed to attend subsequent sessions without charge for the Professors' fees.

Graduates of the Medical Department of this College are admitted free. Graduates of other colleges in good standing are admitted on the payment of a Matriculation Fee of $5. This concession does not include Laboratory Courses and Dissecting, for which a reasonable charge will be made.

APPOINTMENTS.

At the close of the session 1899-1900, members of the Graduating Class will be appointed resident physicians to the following institutions:

Two to the Old Dominion Hospital Richmond, Va.
One to the City Almshouse Hospital Richmond, Va.
One to the St. Vincents' Hospital Norfolk, Va.
One to the Norfolk Protestant Hospital Norfolk, Va.

BOARD.

Suitable board may be obtained convenient to the College and Hospital and City Dispensary at from $12 to $20 per month. Applicants for boarding-houses may apply to the Janitor, who will see that they are comfortably accommodated. Students, upon arriving in the city, are advised to deliver their baggage checks to the Janitor, who will attend to the delivery of baggage to their boarding-houses.

TEXTBOOKS.

The student should select from the following list one or more books on each of the subjects.

ANATOMY. Gray, American Edition; Morris; Quajo; Haynes' Manual.
PHYSTOLOGY.-Kirke; Foster; Stirling's Practical; American Text-Book; McGregor-Robertson's Physiological Physics.
HYGIENE.--Rohe; Suck.
CHEMISTRY-Simon; W. H. Taylor's Outlines; Attfield; Ralfe's Clinical; Purdy's Uranalysis.
MEDICAL JURISIRUDENCE AND TOXICOLOGY.-Reese; W. H. Taylor's Outlines; Taylor; Blyth's Poisons.
MATERIA MEDICA AND THERAPUTICS.-Hare's Practical Therapeutics, seventh edition; Thornton's Dose-Book and Manual of Prescription Writing; Williams' Abstract of Lectures; Butler; Brunton; Ringer's Therapeutics.
PRACTICE OF MEDICINE.-Tyson, last edition; Strumpell; American Text-Book; Dacosta's Medical Diagnosis; Page's Physical Diagnosis.
PRINCIPLES OF SURGERY.-Senn.
PRACTICE OF SURGERY.-American Text-Book; Wyeth; Park.
ORTHOPEDIC SURGERY.-Moore.
GENITO-URINARY DISEASES, WITH SYPHILIS.-Wilite and Martin; American Text-Book.
GYNECOLOGY AND ABDOMINAL SURGERY.-Penrose; Greig- Smith.
OBSTETRICS.-Hirst; Parvin; Grandin and Jarman; American Text-Book.
DISEASES OF CHILDREN.-Holt; American Text-Book.
HISTOLOGY.-Piersol; Stohr.
PATHOLOGY.-Delafield and Prudden; Stengel; Coplin.
BACTERIOLOGY.-Abbott; McFarland; Sternberg.
DISEASES OF THE EYE. -Swanzy; Fuchs.
DISEASES OF THE EAR.-Bacon; Burnett.
DISEASES OF THE THROAT-Bishop; Bosworth.
DISEASES OF THE NERVOUS SYSTEM.-Gray; Gowers; Hirt.
DISEASES OF THE SKIN.-Kaposi; Shoemaker; Crocker.
PHYSICAL DIAGNOSIS.-Tyson; Page; DaCosta's Medical Diagnosis.
MEDICAL DICTIONARIES-Gould; Keating; Thomas.

Any further information relating to the College may be obtained by addressing, CHRISTOPHER TOMPKINS, M.D., Medical College of Virginia, Dean of the Faculty. Corner Marshall and College streets, Richmond, Va.

PRACTICAL MICROSCOPY.-A Course of Lectures beginning on the day after the Commencement exenelaes will be given by Professor F. C. Levy on the Practical Uses of the Microscope in Medicine and Surgery. This course is intended for practitioners as well as students, and will embrace the study of Urine, Sputum, Blood, and various Pathological Tissues, and Bacteriology, so far as It concerns the practitioner.

Virginia School of Dentistry of the Medical College of Virginia

Faculty

Henry C. Jones, D. D. S., Chairman of the Faculty, Professor of Operative and Clinical Dentistry
Edwin P. Wright, D. D. S., Professor of Prosthetic Dentistry
William H. Taylor, M.D., Professor of Chemistry and Metallurgy
Charles M. Hazen, M.D., Professor of Physiology and Hygine
William P. Mathews, M.D., Professor of Anatomy
E. C. Levy, M. D., Professor Histology, Pathology and Bacteriology
R. F. Williams, M. D., Professor of Materia Medica and Theraputics
Richard C. Walden, D. D. S., Acting Professor of Principles of Dentistry, Oral Surgery, and Special Anatomy of the Head, and Instructor in Crown and Bridge Work

SCHOOL OF DENTISTRY.

ANNOUNCEMENT, SESSION 1899-1900.

IN presenting this, the Third Annual Announcement of the Virginia School of Dentistry of the Medical College of Virginia, special attention is called to the fact that this is purely a DENTAL SCHOOL, not directly connected with any other department of the College.

The Faculty in this Department will maintain the same high standard of teaching which has characterized the mother school. The Collateral Branches of Medicine will be thoroughly taught, but as they may best meet the needs of the dental practitioner. The large surgical clinics of the Old Dominion Hospital and the City Free Dispensary, both of which adjoin the College, are open to dental students, thus giving them an opportunity to become familiar with the diseases and the operations of practical surgery.

PLAN OF INSTRUCTION.

Instruction is given in a three-years graded course, which comprises Didactic Lectures with Demonstrations, Clinical Teaching, Recitations, Examinations, and Practical Work in the Infirmary and Laboratories.

LECTURES.

Complete Courses of Lectures will be given by the Faculty on the following branches: Principles of Dentistry, Operative Dentistry, Prosthetic Dentistry, Oral Surgery, Orthodontia, Operative Technique, Prosthetic Technique, General Anatomy, Dental Anatomy, Practical Anatomy, Chemistry, Metallurgy, Physiology, Hygiene, Materia Medica, Therapeutics, Histology, Pathology, Bacteriology, and Dental Jurisprudence.

The Courses are so arranged as to cover the entire session, and it is of material importance that students should be in attendance the first day.

CLASSES

Students will be divided into three classes--Junior, Intermediate and Senior.

INFIRMARY AND LABORATORY INSTRUCTION.

The benefits to be derived by the Dental Student from Infirmary and Laboratory Practice cannot be overestimated. Each student, therefore, will have opportunity, from a well-assured supply of clinical material, of gaining practical knowledge and skill in manipulation, thus preparing him to enter, after graduation, with confidence upon the active duties of his profession.

The Infirmary is kept open during the interim between sessions in order to give students the fullest possible advantage of clinical instruction. There is no charge made to students for this privilege. This arrangement will enable students to become proficient in operative and prosthetic practice.

DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION.

OPERATIVE AND CLINICAL DENTISTRY.
PROF. HENRY C. JONES, D. D. S.

Instruction in the practice of Operative Dentistry will be given by means of didactic and clinical lectures.

Operative Technique will be especially taught, a thorough mastery of this being essential to produce a skillful operator.

The clinical material necessary to give advanced students every opportunity to put into practice the principles inculcated is abundant. Especial attention will be given to the reception and management of the patient.

PRINCIPLES OF DENTISTRY, ORAL SURGERY, AND SPECIAL ANATOMY OF THE HEAD.

ACTING PROF. RICHARD C. WALDEN, D. D. S.

Instruction in the Principles of Dentistry will embrace a thorough consideration of all subjects pertaining to the etiology, pathology, diagnosis, and treatment of the morbid conditions of the teeth and related parts.

Oral Surgery Will be taught by didactic lectures abundantly illustrated by specimens, casts, drawings, and all other appropriate aids to instruction.

Every point which is of practical interest to the dental practitioner is in this course brought out and fully elucidated.

PROSTHETIC DENTISTRY

PROF. EDWIN P. WRIGHT, D. D. S.

The instruction in Prosthetic Dentistry will be eminently practical and thorough. The student will be required to construct, under the eye of the demonstrator, experimental and practical appliances and dentures of various kinds. He will be taught the principles involved in the construction of artificial dentures,-as they refer to mastication, enunciation and facial expression,-tbe importance and principles of correcting dental irregularities, and also the choice of material for his work.

Special attention will be given to the various metals and alloys, with their value in Prosthesis.

As the course advances, the student is required to demonstrate his correct conception and analysis of the subject-matter recently lectured upon.

CHEMISTRY AND METALLURGY.

PROF. WILLIAM H. TAYLOR, M. D.

Chemistry and Metallurgy will be taught by means of lectures and work in the Chemical and Metallurgical Laboratories. A prime object of the lectures will be to give a clear exposition of the fundamental principles and facts of these sciences, and to show how these principles and facts are rationally applied in practice. Particular attention will be bestowed upon the numerous special relations which connect Chemistry and Metallurgy with Dentistry, and these will be presented in a manner which will enable the student to fully utilize them in his professional work.

PHYSIOLOGY AND HYGIENE.

PROF. CHAS. M HAZEN M. D.

By means of didactic lectures, examinations, and practical demonstrations, Physiology will be taught in a two-years' course. Especial attention will be given to the physiology of the mouth and contiguous cavities, as well as to the functions of the cranial nerves to other subjects of particular interest and importance to the dentist.

General and Special Hygiene will be presented to the third-year students in a systematic course of lectures, which will be amply illustrated.

 

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Old Dominion Hospital

ANATOMY.

PROF. WILLIAM P MATHEWS, M. D

The course of teaching in this department will be complete and in line with the many advances recently made in this branch. The lectures will be impressed upon the student by fresh dissections of the cadaver, by plates, drawings, models, and carefully-preserved specimens from the extensive and excellent Museum of the College.

HISTOLOCY, PATHOLOGY, AND BACTERIOLOGY.

PROF E.G. LEVY, M.D.

New and thoroughly equipped Laboratories offer unsurpassed facilities for instruction in these branches. The student is taught by Lectures, Examinations, and Practical Laboratory Work. While each student must mount and study specimens of the various organs and tissues of tile body (both normal and diseased), special attention will be directed to those parts of Histology, Pathology, and Bacteriology bearing upon the Theory and Practice of Dentistry.

MATERIA MEDICA AND THERAPEUTICS.

PROF. ROBERT F. WILLIAMS, M. D.

Instruction in this department will be given by Didactic Lectures, Examinations, and Demonstrations, and the courses will be thoroughly practical. Materia Medica is taught in the first and second years. The courses embrace a description of the individual drugs used in treating disease, their Physiological action and Therapeutic uses, the modes of combining and administering drugs and their incompatibilities, prescription writing, and the study of poisons and their antidotes. Special attention will be directed to those drugs employed in Dental Practice.

A large cabinet of drugs and medicinal preparations attached to this department affords the student an opportunity to familiarize himself with the characteristics of the drugs considered in the lectures.

[At this point, there is a schedule of classes, omitted in this online version]

ADMISSION AND REQUIREMENTS.

  1. No student applying for matriculation will be admitted if, in the opinion of the Faculty, his preliminary education is not sufficient to justify his entering on the study of Dentistry. He must, therefore, present evidence that he is a graduate of a college or high school or of some other literary institution of approved standing, or else he must stand an examination, to be conducted under the supervision of the Faculty, in accordance with the requirements of the National Association of Dental Faculties.
  2. Students will be admitted to the Intermediate Class who present certificates from a recognized dental college showing that they have attended one full course of lectures, and have passed satisfactory examinations thereon.
  3. Students will be admitted to the Senior Class who present certificates from this or any other recognized dental college showing that they have attended two full courses of lectures, and have passed satisfactory examinations thereon.
  4. Candidates for advanced standing must present their certificates before matriculating.
  5. Candidates who fail in the examination for advancement will be entitled to stand another examination at the beginning of the next session, not later than November 1st.
  6. A diploma from a reputable medical college will entitle its holder to enter the intermediate Class in this School. He will be excused from attending lectures and examinations on Anatomy, Chemistry, Physiology, Materia Medica, and Therapeutics.
  7. Undergraduates of Medicine will be admitted into the Intermediate Class, subject to the rules of examination governing admission into that class.
  8. He must have dissected the entire body, which fact must be certified to by the Demonstrator of Anatomy of the institution where such dissection was made.
  9. He must present to the Professor of Operative Dentistry a patient upon whom he has performed the usual dental operations.
  10. He must deposit with the Professor of Prosthetic Dentistry a specimen of his mechanical work, and submit at least one practical case.
  11. He must have satisfactorily passed an examination on all the branches taught in this School.
  12. He must deliver to the Dean, on or before the first day of March, the fee for the examination for the degree.
  13. The examination fee of a rejected candidate will be retained, but no additional fee will be charged for any future examination.
  14. Candidates rejected at the final examination will not be reexamined until after attending another course of lectures.
  15. The degree will not be conferred upon a candidate who absents himself from the Commencement without permission from the Faculty.
  16. When a candidate shall have complied with the foregoing requirements and those adopted by the National Association of Dental Faculties, and there are no opposing moral or intellectual reasons, he will be entitled to the degree of Doctor of Dental Surgery.
  17. Students will be held responsible for any loss or damage they may inflict on College property.
  18. The Faculty reserves the right to terminate the connection of a student with the College for what, in the opinion of the Faculty, is on his part inexcusably bad conduct or other disqualification.

STATE STUDENTS.

In conformity with the custom of the Medical College of Virginia and for reasons given in another part of this Announcement, the Faculty of the School of Dentistry has decided to receive and educate, free of all charges save Matriculation and Diploma fees, five students, to be appointed in the same manner as the State Medical Students, the Senators having been arranged in groups of eight for this purpose.

THE MEDICAL COLLEGE OF VIRGINIA

INSTRUMENTS AND TOOLS.

The instruments required for use in this School can be procured for from $35 to $50, and are such as will be necessary in practice after graduation. These amounts do not include the cost of a dental engine.

Students who have dental engines, laboratory tools, and appliances, should bring them; those who have not are advised to defer purchasing till they arrive, as they will then have the aid of the teachers in making proper selections. Each student is required to procure the necessary tools and appliances for his own use, and carefully keep them.

TEXTBOOKS.

The student should select from the following list one or more books on each of the subjects. Generally, the one first named is preferred:

PRINCIPLES OF DENTISTRY.-Harris; James.
OPERATlVE DENTISTRY.-Harris; American System of Dentistry.
PROSTHETIC DENTISIRT.-Essig.
ORAL SUROERY.-Garretson.
ORAL DEFORMITXES.-Kingsley.
CROWN AND BUDGE WORK.-Evans.
ANATOMY.-Gray, American edition.
DENTAL ANATOMY.-Black.
CHEMISTRY. -Simon; Taylor's Outlines.
DENTAL CHEMISTRY AND METALLURGY.-Mitchell.
PHYSIOLOGY.-Kirke; Stewart; Stirling's Practical; Landois and Sterling; American Text-Book.
HYGIENE.-Rohe; Buck.
HISTOIOGY.-Piersol; Stohr.
PATHOLOGY.-Ddafield and Prudden; Coplin; Ziegler.
BACTERIOLOGY.-Abbott; McFarland; Sternberg.
DENTAL DICTIONARY.--Harris

FEES

The fees for the entire session are $65. This includes the fees for Matriculation, Lectures, Regular Examinations, Clinics, Demonstrations in Anatomy, Chemistry, and all other branches, embracing Infirmary and Laboratory Work and Anatomical Material.

The examination fee for the degree of Doctor of Dental Surgery (paid only once), is $30. No reduction from the above fees will be made. All fees are payable in advance.

Students who have paid their fees for three regular sessions are allowed to attend subsequent sessions without charge for the Professors' fees.

Graduates of this College are admitted free. Graduates of other dental colleges in go6d standing are admitted on the payment of a Matriculation Fee of $5. This concession does not include fees for Laboratory Courses or Dissection, for which a reasonable charge will he made.

BOARD.

Good board can be obtained at reasonable prices.

Any further information may be obtained by addressing the undersigned. Henry C. Jones, D. D.S.,
Chairman of Dental Faculty
915 1./2 E Main Street, Richmond, Va.

VIRGINIA SCHOOL OF PHARMACY OF THE MEDICAL COLLEGE OF VIRGINIA.

FACULTY.

F. M. READE, M. D., Chairman of Faculty, Professor of Theory and Practice of Pharmacy.
JAS. M. WHITFIELD, M.D., Professor of Organic and Analytical Chemistry.
WM. H. TAYLOR, M.D., Professor of Central and Inorganic Chemistry and Toxicology
RO. F. WILLIAMS, M.D., Professor of Materia Medica
F. H. BEADLES, M. D., Professor of Botany and Pharmacognosy

 

SCHOOL OF PHARMACY.

ANNOUNCEMENT. SESSION 1899-1900

THIS important department of the Medical College of Virginia has been established to furnish to students the means of acquiring a practical education in all branches of study relating to Pharmacy. Its connection with a College entering upon its sixty-second successful year as an educational institution warrants the statement that everything will be done to make the course of instruction thorough and complete. The necessity for a scientific as well as practical education for one who desires more than partial success in pharmaceutical work becomes daily more apparent. The rapid progress of scientific discovery pertaining to this profession makes a systematic, graded, and carefully directed course of study necessary for those who intend to follow it.

CURRICULUM.

A two-years' graded course of instruction in Pharmacy, Materia Medica, Botany, Inorganic and Organic Chemistry, Qualitative and Quantitative Analysis, and Toxicology, consisting of lectures, practical work in well-equipped Laboratories, and recitations conducted by competent instructors, will be given.

THEORY AND PRACTICE OF PHARMACY

PROF. FRANK M. REALE, M. D.

The Lectures on Pharmacy, for both Junior and Senior Courses, will be delivered in the Pharmaceutical Laboratory, so that each student may have before him his individual outfit of apparatus, and thereby be enabled to follow with exyenments of his own the practical demonstrations of his instructor.

Instruction in the Junior Course will consist of a series of lectures, in which the various pharmaceutical operations will be explained and illustrated. After a consideration of the Pharmacopoeias, the subjects of Weights and Measures, Specific Gravity, the Generation, Application and Measurement of Heat, Solution, Dialysis, etc., be taken up, followed by practical instruction in the manufacture the more important Galenical Preparations of the Pharmacopoeia.

In the Senior Course the Inorganic Chemicals of the Pharmacopeia will be taken up. Their methods of manufacture, tests for identity and purity, and uses in medicine and pharmacy will receive special attention. Following this, the Organic Chemicals of the Pharmacopoeia will be treated in the same manner. The latter part of this course will be devoted to an exhaustive consideration of Prescriptions and Dispensing. Therapeutical, physical, and chemical incompatibilities will be explained, and the methods of surmounting incident difficulties considered. In their practical work the students will be under the immediate supervision of their instructors, and abundant opportunity for experience in compounding will be furnished.

 

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Maternity Hospital

ORGANIC AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY.

PROF. JAMES M. WHITFIELD, M. D.

The course in Organic Chemistry will be given in the Senior year. The aim of this course is to instruct the student in the general principles of the subject and to familiarize him with the composition, properties, and uses of the drugs and reagents of the Pharmacopoeia.

The course in Analytical Chemistry will cover a period of two sessions. During the Junior year the time will be devoted to the qualitative examination of substances, both organic and inorganic.

During the Senior year Quantitative Analysis, both Gravimetric and Volumetric, will be studied.

The course in Analytical Chemistry will be shaped in accordance with the requirements of the U. S. Pharmacopoeia, the idea in view being to instruct students in methods useful to Pharmacists rather than to graduate Analytical Chemists. Ample facilities for practical work have been provided for members of this class in the new Chemical Laboratory, one portion of which has been liberally furnished and set apart for their exclusive use.

GENERAL AND INORGANIC CHEMISTRY AND TOXICOLOGY.

PROF. WILLIAM H. TAYLOR, M. D.

These subjects will be taught by lectures, supplemented by work in the Laboratory. In the lectures on Chemistry the general principles of the science will be presented in a form readily understood, and so as to make their application to particular cases easy. In the consideration of the several chemical substances their pharmaceutical relations will be constantly kept in view, and the student will be put in possession of all that is necessary to give him a complete practical knowledge of medicinal agents as they are regarded by the pharmaceutical chemist.

Great attention will be paid to Toxicology. Its principles and practice will be elaborately explained, and much care will be bestowed upon serviceable instruction in the methods of detecting poisons and in the treatment of poisoning.

MATERIA MEDICA.

PROF. Ro. F. WILLIAMS, M. D.

A general course in Materia Medica is given in the first year, embracing a description of the individual drugs, their source, habitat, physical properties, chemical constituents, preparations and dosage, the modes of combining and administering drugs, and their incompatibilities, and the study of poisons and their antidotes. The student is thoroughly drilled in the art of prescription writing as a means of acquiring ease in reading prescriptions and detecting errors.

A large cabinet of drugs and medicinal preparations attached to this department affords the student an opportunity to familiarize himself with the characteristics of the drugs considered in the lecture.

BOTANY AND PHARMACOGNOSY

PROF. F H. BEADLES, M. D.

The student will be thoroughly instructed as to that plant in general; the morphology, physiology, and biology of flowering plants, including roots, stems, leaves, flowers, fruits, and seeds, and the methods of naming and classifying plants.

The object of the course in Pharmacognosy is to impress on the mind of the student the importance of dose and accurate observation; to instill in him right methods of studying drugs; to familiarize him, by the direct and systematic study of the materials themselves, with the structural characteristics of the different parts of plants employed in medicine; and to prepare him to detect with certainty sophistications and substitutions.

PHARMACEUTICAL LABORATORY

Experience has shown that the amount of laboratory work usually required of pharmacy students is insufficient for their thorough education. Believing that this, the practical part of their course, is of supreme importance, it has been decided to devote a largely increased amount of time to laboratory instruction. The work in this department will include all of the pharmaceutical operations from the manufacture of the simple preparations to those requiring the most skillful and careful manipulation of special apparatus in their production.

PRACTICAL DISPENSING.

Connected with the College is the City Free Dispensary, where from fifty to one hundred prescriptions are compounded daily.

All students who are not employed in a dispensing pharmacy will be required to devote two hours each week day to the compounding of prescriptions in the Laboratory connected with this Dispensary, and to the manufacture of the pharmaceutical products which are dispensed. This work will be performed under the supervision of licensed pharmacists, and as it will consist of exactly the kind of work that will be required of the students by their future employers, its practical value to them cannot be overestimated.

 

SCHEDULE OF LECTURES.

[Omitted]

ADMISSION AND REQUIREMENTS.

  1. No student applying for matriculation will be admitted if, in the opinion of the Faculty, his preliminary education is not sufficient to justify his entering on the study of Pharmacy. He must, therefore, present evidence that he is a graduate of a college or high school, or of some other literary institution of approved standing, or else he must pass an examination, to be conducted under the supervision of the Faculty, equivalent to that which is required of an applicant for a second-grade teacher's certificate-namely, in Spelling, Writing, School Arithmetic, Practical Grammar, Ordinary School Geography, and History of the United States.
  2. Students who have completed the Junior course in any other reputable college of pharmacy will be admitted to the. Senior course in this School without examination on presenting evidence of having passed satisfactory examinations.
  3. Should the Junior student fail on any branch in this course he will be entitled to stand another examination at the beginning of the next session, not later than November 1st.
  4. The candidate for the degree of Graduate in Pharmacy must have attended two full courses of lectures and laboratory work, each in a separate year. The last of these courses must have been attended in this School.
  5. He must have satisfactorily passed an examination on all the branches taught in the School of Pharmacy of this College.
  6. He must deliver to the Chairman of the School of Pharmacy, on or before March 1st of the year of his prospective graduation, the fee for the examination for the degree.
  7. The examination fee of a rejected candidate will be retained, but no additional fee will be charged for any future examination.
  8. Candidates rejected at the final examination will not be reexamined until after attending another course of lectures.
  9. The degree of Graduate in Pharmacy will be conferred only on students who have reached the age of twenty-one years, and have had the required experience with a qualified pharmacist in a dispensing pharmacy. Any student who has not attained his majority or has not had sufficient experience, but has successfully passed his final examination, will receive a Certificate, which can be exchanged for the Diploma as soon as the requisite conditions have been fulfilled.
  10. The degree will not be conferred upon a candidate who absents himself from the Commencement without the permission of the Faculty.
  11. When the candidate shall have complied with the foregoing requirements, and there are no opposing moral or intellectual reasons, he will be entitled to the degree of Graduate in Pharmacy.
  12. Students will be held responsible for any loss or damage they may inflict on College property.
  13. The Faculty reserves the right to terminate the connection of a student with the College for what, in the opinion of the Faculty, is on his part inexcusably bad conduct, or other disqualification.

STATE STUDENTS.

In conformity with the custom of the Medical College of Virginia and for reasons given in another part of this Announcement, the Faculty of the School of Pharmacy has decided to receive and educate, free of all charges save Matriculation and Diploma fees, four students, to be appointed in the same manner as the State Medical Students, the Senators having been arranged in groups of ten for the purpose.

FEES.

The fees for the entire session are $60. This includes the fees for Matriculation, Lectures, Regular Examinations, and Laboratory work.

The examination fee for the degree of Graduate in Pharmacy (paid only once) is $15.

No reduction front the above fees. All fees are payable in advance.

Students who have paid their fees for two regular sessions in the School of Pharmacy of this College are allowed to attend subsequent sessions without charge for the Professors' fees.

Graduates in Pharmacy of this College will be admitted free. Graduates of other pharmaceutical colleges in good standing will be admitted on the payment of a Matriculation fee of $5. This concession does not include the Laboratory course, for which a reasonable charge will be made.

BOARD.

Good board can be obtained at reasonable prices.

EMPLOYMENT.

Realizing that some students find it necessary to obtain employment while pursuing their studies, the Faculty will render such assistance as it can in securing positions for them, and the lectures will be arranged, as far as possible, to accommodate them.

TEXT BOOKS.

The student should select from the following list one or more books on each of the subjects. Generally, the first one named is preferred:

PHARMACY.-Remington's Practice, third edition; Coblentz; Scoville's Art of Compounding; United States Pharmacopoeia; United States Dispensatory; National Dispensatory.
CHEMISnY.-Simon; Taylor's Outlines; Attfield; Schimpfs' Volumetric Analysis; Caldwell; Fresenius; Remsen's Organic Chemistry.
TOXICOLOGY.-Reese; Taylor's Ouflines; Blyth's Poisons.
MATERIA MEDICA.-Sayres' Organic Materia Medica and Pharmacognosy.
BOTANY.--Bastin's College Botany; Gray's Structural Botany.

Address all communications pertaining to the School of Pharmacy to the Chairman, F.M. READE, M.D.,
Cor. Marshafl and College streets, Richmond, Va.

SOCIETY OF ALUMNI OF THE MEDICAL COLLEGE OF VIRGINIA.

The Society of Alumni of the Medical College of Virginia was organized March 29, 1889. The objects, as set forth in the Constitution, shall be to advance the interests of our Alma Mater, elevate the standard of medical education, had promote social intercourse and professional regard among its members.

Alumni of the three Departments of the College-Medical, Dental and Pharmaceutical-in good standing are eligible to membership, and are requested to communicate their addresses to the Secretary of the Society.

The Society, though only in the eleventh year of its existence, is in a flourishing condition, having enrolled about one hundred and eighty alumni.

The Society meets annually, at the hours of 11 A. M. and 5 P. M., on the day appointed for the Commencement exercises of the College. The morning session is devoted to the discussion of a selected scientific subject, and the evening session to the annual address and general business. The subject for discussion at the next meeting is "Cerebro-Spinal Meningitis," with Dr. S.D. Barham as leader.

The following are the officers for the ensuing year-:

Dr. W. F. ANDERSON, President Farmyille, Va.
Dr. T. K BAIRD, First Vice-President Windsor, Va.
Dr W. F. DREWRY, Second Vice-President Petersburg, Va
Dr. T. W. DEW, Third Vice-President Spottsylvania, Va.
Dr. J. B. FISHER, Fourth Vice-President Midlothian, Va.
Dr. D. A. KUYK, Secretary Richmond, Va.
Dr. K W. GEE, Assistant Secretary Richmond, Va.
Dr. F. H. BEADLES, Treasurer Richmond, Va.
Dr. CHARLES R. ROBINS, Registrar Richmond, Va.

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE:

Dr. GEORGE BEN. JOHNSTON Richmond, Va.
Dr W. E. HARRELL Williamston, N. C
Dr. THOMAS P. MATHEWS Manchester, Va.
Dr. C. V. ROBINSON Petersburg, Va.

D. A. KUYK, M.D.,
Sec'y Society of Alumni Med. College of Virginia,
No.4 West Grace street,

OLD DOMINION HOSPITAL

1225 East Marshall Street.

THIS Hospital, under a Board of Lady Managers, is situated on Marshall between College and Twelfth streets, is very desirably located in a quiet yet central portion of the city, and is easily accessible, one car-line passing the front door and two other lines, which run from the eastern to the western limits of the city, being within a few blocks of the institution.

The building, originally constructed according to the best designs for a Hospital, has recently undergone such remodeling and improvements as to bring it fully up to the standard of modern sanitary requirements. The plumbing throughout the house is entirely new and of the most approved character, and every point of sanitation has been carefully attended to.

The Hospital contains, besides excellent wards, numerous private rooms, all of which are light and airy, and are comfortably and in many instances elegantly furnished.

Three spacious verandas afford convalescents the great advantage of obtaining air and exercise with a minimum of fatigue.

The food, nursing, and general attention to the patients are all that could be desired.

This Institution was designated by the United States Government as its Hospital for the care of soldiers stationed at and near Richmond during the Spanish-American war.

During the encampment of the U. S. Volunteers at Richmond two hundred and fifty-one officers and soldiers were treated at this Hospital for Measles, Typhoid Fever, and other dangerous diseases. So successful was the treatment of these men that only four of the total number received succumbed to disease.

The new and admirably equipped Maternity Hospital is an annex of the Old Dominion Hospital, and its nursing is done by the Old Dominion nurses.

TERMS OF ADMISSION

The charge for beds in wards is $5 per week. The charge for private rooms ranges from $10 to $25 per week, according to location. This includes board and general nursing.

The services of an exclusive nurse, laundry expenses, physician's fees, medicines, and anaesthesia are extras. To patients recommended by this Hospital's Benevolent Societies there are special rates.

A specified number of patients will be cared for free of all charge.

To other indigent patients a uniform rate of $5 per week has been established.

Whenever there is room and the condition of the patient does not forbid, companions can be accommodated at the rate of $15 per week. Charges are payable weekly in advance to the Clerk. Charity cases are the only exception to this rule.

Letters of inquiry may be sent to any member of the Staff of Physicians or to the Superintendent of the Hospital, or personal interviews may be held with any of these authorities.

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A Corner of the Children's Ward

TRAINING SCHOOL FOR NURSES OF OLD DOMINION HOSPITAL.

Connected with the Old Dominion Hospital is a Training School for Nurses, conducted by the Superintendent of the Hospital and the Faculty of the College. Complete instruction and training in the theory and practice of Nursing are given in this school. The period of study extends over two full years. - For further information apply to the Superintendent of the Old Dominion Hospital.

HOSPITAL STAFF.

Gereral Medicine.-H. H. LEVY, M. D., R. F. WILLIAMS, M. D., CHAS. M. HAZEN, M.D.
Obstetrics.-CHRISTOPHER TOMPKINS, M. D., J. FACE MASSIE, M. D.
Gynecology and Abdominal Surgery.-GEO. BEN. JOHNSTON, M. D.
General Surgery.-LEWIS C. BOSHER, M.D.
Diseases of the Nervous System.-J. PAGE MASSIE, M. D.
Diseases of Children.-CHARLES A. BLANTON, M. D.
Diseases of the Skin.-F. H. BEADLES, M. D.
Orthopedic Surgery.-WM. P. MATHEWS, M. D.
Diseases of the Eye, Ear and Throat.-JOHN P. DAVIDSON, M. D.
Consulting Chemist,-WM. H. TAYLOR, M.D.
Pathologist and Bacteriologist.-E. C. LEVY, M. D.
Consulting Oral Surgeon.--HENRY C. JONES, D. D. S.
Resident Physicians.-S. R. JORDAN, M. D., MANERED CALL, M. D.

HISTORICAL NOTE

THE MEDICAL COLLEGE OF VIRGINIA was organized in 1838 by Doctors John Cullen, Augustus L. Warner, Thomas Johnson, Lewis W. Chamberlayne, Richard L. Bohannon and Socrates Maupin, under the name of the Medical Department of Hampden-Sidney College, and was the first medical school to stem the tide of students then going by thousands to northern colleges. Owing to a disagreement between the Governing Board of Hampden-Sidney College and the Professors of the Medical Department, the Legislature of Virginia, on February 25, 1854, gave a charter to the Institution under the name of the MEDICAL COLLEGE OF VIRGINIA.

In 1861, when the war broke out and the Southern students at Philadelphia seceded and came to Richmond, the College received from the Legislature of Virginia, then in session, $30,000 to build a Hospital, on condition that the Faculty would deed to the State the College building and appurtenances, which tip to that time belonged in fee simple to the Faculty, inasmuch as the land on which the College was built had been deeded to it by the city of Richmond, subject to a mortgage of $15,000 loaned by the State to equip the school. This deed, a munificent present, worth at that time $40,000, is on record, and the College thus became the entire property of the State of Virginia.

In all these years the College has supplied Virginia and other Southern States with the rank and file of the profession, the working medical men of the counties and towns, and has made a noble record. During the War it was the only medical school in the Confederacy, and held during that period two annual sessions, supplying the army with a staff of surgeons, whose history, as registered in the army records of the United States, published by act of Congress, is a glorious illustration of their hard and faithful service.

The following gentlemen have been, or now are, Professors in the institution: Enieritus Professors-Doctors B. R. Wellford, L. S. Joynes, Hunter McGuire, O. F. Manson, F. D. Cunningham, J. S. Wellford, M. L. James, J. W. Long, John N. Upsher, Christopher Tompkins. Chemistry-Socrates Maupin, M. P. Scott, James B. McCaw, R. S. J. Peebles, William H. Taylor. Obstetrics-R. L. Bohannon, J. H. Conway, R. T. Coleman, Christopher Tompkins, J. Page Massie. Physiology-E. Brown-Sequard, L. S. Joynes, O. F. Manson, H. H. Levy, Charles M. Hazen. Practice of Medicine-John Cullen, David H. Tucker, James B. McCaw, M. L. James, John N. Upshnr, H. H. Levy. Anatomy-Tho. Johnson, Jeffries Wyman, Carter P. Johnson, A. F. Peticolas, F. D. Cunningham, Christopher Tompkins, George Ben. Johnston, Lewis C. Bosher, William P. Mathews. Surgery-Aug. L. Warner, Charles Bell Gibson; Hunter McGuire, J. S. D. Cullen, George Ben. Johnston, Lewis C. Boslier. Diseases of Women and Children-J. S. D. Cullen, J. S. Wellford, J. W. Long, George Ben. Johnston, Charles A. Blanton. Materia Medico and Therapeutics-L. W. Chamberlayne, B. R. Weliford, J.S. Wellford, M. L. James, John N. Upshur, C. A. Blanton, Ro. F. Williams. Diseases of Eye, Ear and Throat--Charles M. Shields, John P. Davidson. Histology, Pathology and Bacteriology-E. S. Gaillard, O. F. Manson, J. Page Massie, E. C. Levy. The following have been Deans: Socrates Maupin, David H. Tucker, Levin S. Joynes, James B. McCaw, M. L. James, J. S. D. Cullen, Christopher Tomp